Bringing Government into the 21st Century : The Korean Digital Governance Experience

Title: Bringing Government into the 21st Century : The Korean Digital Governance Experience
Authors: Tina George Karippacheril, Soonhee Kim, Robert P. Jr.Beschel, Changyong Choi
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 21/06/2016
Date (accessed): 19/08/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This volume—a collaborative work between the World Bank’s Global Governance Practice and a team of researchers working with the Korean Development Institute—is dedicated to the proposition that there is much that can be learned from a careful and nuanced assessment of Korea’s experience with e-governance. It seeks to draw lessons both from the large reservoir of experience as to what has worked, as well as the more limited and isolated examples of what has not. In particular, it seeks to achieve two objectives.
The first is to accurately understand, capture and distill the key dimensions of Korea’s e-governance experience so that it can be properly understood and appreciated. Towards this end, some of the world’s leading experts on Korea’s e-governance experience have been engaged in its preparation, and their conclusions have been carefully vetted and reviewed by other leading scholars of the role of IT systems within government. The goal is to avoid flip generalizations or characterizations, such as “political will is important” or “it is important to embed e-governance within a broader strategy to develop a domestic IT industry,” but to truly understand the complex interplay between differing political, economic and bureaucratic interests and how they shaped decisions about developing the technological and human infrastructure that would support Korea’s successful thrust to be the world’s leading nation in this area.
The second is to ponder the lessons learned and what did and did not work from Korea’s experience for other developing countries seeking to strengthen the role of information technology within their public sectors.

Free Text Service Busts HIV Myths For Mozambique’s Youth

Title: Free Text Service Busts HIV Myths For Mozambique’s Youth
Author: Hannah McNeish
Source: The Huffington Post
Date (published): 25/07/2016
Date (accessed): 19/08/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Since April, the UNICEF-funded ‘SMS-Biz’ myth-busting project aimed at 10 to 24-year-olds has been rolled out in 40 of Gaza’s schools. Many teens think you contract HIV by using an infected person’s eating utensils and kissing with tongues.

Touch Screens Touch Lives in Benin

Title: Touch Screens Touch Lives in Benin
Author: Evan Fowler
Source: Dimagi - Open and Innovative Technology for Underserved Communities
Date (published): 30/03/2016
Date (accessed): 19/08/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Evan Fowler is a Peace Corps volunteer based in Benin. In this piece, Fowler shares how in three months she transitioned from being a first-time smartphone owner to building an app to support Malaria prevention in Benin.

Complex Emergencies 2.0: Dumb Phones, Smart People and the Art of Humanitarian Communications

Title: Complex Emergencies 2.0: Dumb Phones, Smart People and the Art of Humanitarian Communications
Author: Amy Rhoades
Source: Global Policy Journal
Date (published): 25/07/2016
Date (accessed): 19/08/2016
Type of information: research paper
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: An arc of instability from Afghanistan through the Middle East to West Africa is leading to unprecedented displacement and forced migration with a staggering 87.6 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. This global crisis of epic dimensions is straining the humanitarian system to a breaking point. Despite the huge need, OCHA’s recent appeal for 20.1 billion USD is 80% underfunded and that is unlikely to change. One common thread that connects the communities affected by the many intractable, complex emergencies that beset the world today is mobile technology, whether ‘dumb’ feature phones or new generation smartphones. They are tapping into the social networks that enable them to stay connected to one another in every phase of the crisis. An increasingly urgent question is whether technology can do more than is currently being asked of it by enabling people to be better informed and empowered to respond to needs locally in complex emergencies rather than waiting for international aid that realistically may never come. The rapid and increasing exposure of crisis-affected populations to communications tools has profound implications for humanitarian contexts:
- It puts the power of the internet at the fingertips of people on the move, allowing them to problem solve even in complex emergencies with news, maps, money transfer and other tools.
- Crisis-affected people now have access to networks – from diaspora to smugglers – that were previously unavailable to them.
- It brings greater scrutiny to the work of humanitarian actors, accountability by the back door in effect.
This paper explores how the humanitarian community can harness these new realities brought about by the rapid spread of mobile technology to better protect and support the most vulnerable while empowering them to find the most appropriate solutions, thereby easing some of the strain on the humanitarian system.

The Future Is Now: How to Write About ICT4Edu Accurately in 2016

Title: The Future Is Now: How to Write About ICT4Edu Accurately in 2016
Author: Steve Vosloo
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 22/07/2016
Date (accessed): 26/07/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Sarcastic blog post about techno-utopianism in the field of ICT in education.

ICT Capacity Building: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Rwandan Policies from Higher Education Perspective

Title: ICT Capacity Building: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Rwandan Policies from Higher Education Perspective
Authors: Jean Claude Byungura, Henrik Hansson, Kamuzinzi Masengesho, Thashmee Karunaratne
Source: European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning – EURODL
Date (accessed): 26/07/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: With the development of technology in the 21st Century, education systems attempt to integrate technology-based tools to improve experiences in pedagogy and administration. It is becoming increasingly prominent to build human and ICT infrastructure capacities at universities from policy to implementation level. Using a critical discourse analysis, this study investigates the articulation of ICT capacity building strategies from both national and institutional ICT policies in Rwanda, focusing on the higher education. Eleven policy documents were collected and deeply analyzed to understand which claims of ICT capacity building are made. The analysis shows that strategies for building ICT capacities are evidently observed from national level policies and only in two institutional policies (KIST and NUR). Among 25 components of ICT capacity building used, the ones related to human capacity are not plainly described. Additionally, neither national nor institutional policy documents include the creation of financial schemes for students to acquire ICT tools whilst learners are key stakeholders. Although there is some translation of ICT capacity building strategies from national to some institutional policies, planning for motivation and provision of incentives to innovators is not stated in any of the institutional policies and this is a key to effective technology integration.

Using ICTs for citizen feedback on legal services in Rwanda

Title: Using ICTs for citizen feedback on legal services in Rwanda
Author: Richard Kanaga
Source: Oxfam Policy & Practice
Date (published): 07/07/2016
Date (accessed): 26/07/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A key gap in almost all justice systems worldwide is obtaining data on the quality, effectiveness and user perception of justice services. This represents a major gap in ensuring justice sector policy is evidence based and responsive to the needs of the citizens. Through an innovative ICT-enhanced citizen monitoring approach in Rwanda, Richard Kananga explains how Oxfam is working with the Legal Aid Forum (LAF) to empower citizens to provide feedback on how people experience justice services.

Introducing OpenCellular: An open source wireless access platform

Title: Introducing OpenCellular: An open source wireless access platform
Author: Kashif Ali
Source: Facebook Code
Date (published): 06/07/2016
Date (accessed): 26/07/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Facebook has designed and tested an open source and cost-effective, software-defined wireless access platform aimed to improve connectivity in remote areas of the world.

eHealth solutions for Africa

Title: eHealth solutions for Africa
Source: Digital Single Market - European Commission
Date (published): 24/06/2016
Date (accessed): 05/07/2016
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Two European projects, recently funded by the Horizon 2020 programme, want to help Africa through the use of digital health solutions. One aims to improve malaria prevention, the other focusses on newborn babies and their mothers.

Rethinking social change: The promises of Web 2.0 for the marginalized

Title: Rethinking social change: The promises of Web 2.0 for the marginalized
Author: Daavid Nemer
Source: First Monday
Date (published): 06/06/2016
Date (accessed): 05/07/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This paper focuses on the uses of Web 2.0 platforms by residents of favelas, urban slums in Brazil, in order to expand our understanding of what Web 2.0 can and cannot do in terms of social change. To explore this problem space, I draw on a 10-month ethnography in the favelas of Vitória, Brazil to study slum residents’ Web 2.0 practices and engagements. I show how Web 2.0 afforded favela residents the ability to protest and cross social boundaries, but when that happened they faced something much stronger: social exclusion, police brutality against the blacks and poor, and limited civic engagement.

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