Competing for talent: global mobility, immigration and the City of London’s labour market

Title: Competing for talent: global mobility, immigration and the City of London’s labour market
Authors: Jonathan V. Beaverstock, Sarah Hall
Source: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society
Date (published): 06/04/2012
Date (accessed): 28/06/2015
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The City of London’s competitiveness is founded on its global talent pool and ability to attract and retain workers of all nationalities. Drawing on ONS Long-Term International Migration data and fieldwork-based studies of banking, professional services and business education, the argument of this paper is 2-fold: that the City’s competitiveness is significantly dependent on the functioning of its global labour market, of which a key factor is the immigration of European Economic Area (EEA) and non-EEA talent, and that a central determinant of the City’s position as a leading international financial centre based around a highly competitive global labour pool will be UK immigration policy in the wake of the financial crisis of 2007–2008 and ensuing recession.

Humans are tech's next big thing - and that could be risky

Title: Humans are tech's next big thing - and that could be risky
Author: Julia Greenberg
Source: Wired
Date (published): 24/06/2015
Date (accessed): 28/06/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Internet companies make billions of dollars by capturing one of the world’s most precious commodities: your attention. They need to amuse, amaze, entice, and intrigue you—and millions of users like you—to stay afloat and profit. But figuring out what you want to read, watch, and see is harder than it looks.

Teaching information literacy & digital skills in mobile-centric Myanmar

Title: Teaching information literacy & digital skills in mobile-centric Myanmar
Author: Melody Clark
Source: TASCHA - The Technology & Social Change Group
Date (published): 15/06/2015
Date (accessed): 28/06/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: In a country that is essentially going from 0 to 60 in the information age, how do the millions of people coming online via their newly-acquired smartphones learn about all the internet has to offer, that the internet is more than just Facebook? And where and how will they develop the skills to use these technologies and decipher the quality of the information streaming in? One of the major components of our project, Information Strategies for Societies in Transition, is the development and delivery of a mobile-centric digital information literacy curriculum. This curriculum, developed by TASCHA and our partners in Myanmar, aims to help the Burmese develop digital and information literacy in a mobile-centric (in many cases, mobile-only) setting.

Can technology solve America's literacy problem?

Title: Can technology solve America's literacy problem?
Author: Aaron Souppouris
Source: Engadget
Date (published): 26/06/2015
Date (accessed): 28/06/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Roughly 36 million adults in the United States read English at or below a third-grade level. For a predominantly English-speaking country, that's a massive problem. Without an elementary knowledge of the language, this huge portion of the adult population faces a struggle to get by. Finding a job and generally progressing in a career is an obvious issue, but everyday tasks are also difficult. Understanding taxes, helping a child with homework, filling out health care forms or following instructions on medication; these are skills that anyone reading this article takes for granted, but many others toil over daily. We know the situation, but what's the solution? XPRIZE, an organization best known for its efforts to send private rovers to the moon and create a real-life Tricorder, has created a competition to prove that technology is the answer.

Smart City Projects in Brazil

Title: Smart City Projects in Brazil
Source: Innovation House Rio
Date (published): 26/05/2015
Date (accessed): 28/06/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Brazilian cities had unprecedented growth during the last decades, a phenomenon closely tied to the country’s booming economy. Large metropolitan centers such as state capitals Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo became the hubs for the most relevant companies in Brazil and the largest pockets of population, but also became affected by issues such as high crime rates, unreliable traffic flow and sudden rains that led to landslides and floods. Over the last few years, these issues have been tackled by local governments through the use of technology, with smart city projects that placed Brazil at the forefront of urban planning in the world.

ICT for the Development of Labour Productivity in Cameroon

Title: ICT for the Development of Labour Productivity in Cameroon
Authors: Christophe Peguy Choub Faha, Achille Tefong Vaumi
Source: The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries
Date (accessed): 18/06/2015
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This paper uses a new survey data set on manufacturing firms in Cameroon to estimate a Cobb-Douglas production function. Based on a categorization of firms by ownership structure and firms aiming at analysing the constraints surrounding the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) as a tool to improving productivity of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SME) in Cameroon, we have evaluated empirically whether to what extent those technologies have contributed to the growth of labour productivity within the firms. Using the Instrumental Variables method, to account for the endogeneity problem with cross sectional data, we found a positive and significant impact of ICT-capital on labour productivity in Cameroonian’s firms.

Digital and Social Inequalities: a Qualitative Assessment of the Impact of Connecting Equality Program among Argentinean young people

Title: Digital and Social Inequalities: a Qualitative Assessment of the Impact of Connecting Equality Program among Argentinean young people
Authors: Sebastián Benítez Larghi, Magdalena Lemus, Marina Moguillansky, Nicolás Welschinger Lascano
Source: The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries
Date (accessed): 18/06/2015
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This paper focuses on the ties between social and digital inequalities among Argentinean youth. It uses a qualitative approach to explore different aspects of the everyday lives of adolescents, such as sociability, leisure time and family use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), in order to assess the impact of the Connecting Equality Program (Programa Conectar Igualdad, PCI) on reducing digital inequalities and fostering social inclusion. In particular, the paper explores what were the existing conditions of access for students and their families when the PCI was first implemented? What influence does the implementation of the PCI have on the individual, family and scholastic appropriation of ICTs? How does the use of computers and the Internet vary among youth? Has this large-scale incorporation of netbooks in schools, and especially homes and free time changed it in any way? Does the appropriation of ICTs through student participation in the PCI contribute to material and symbolic social inclusion? To answer these questions, we compare the processes of ICT appropriation among lower and middle class adolescents, focusing on the distinctive uses and meanings assigned to computers and the Internet by boys and girls in their daily lives. For this purpose we analyze data collected through semi-structured interviews in two schools in Greater La Plata, Argentina during 2012. The main findings show that in terms of access, skills and types of use, the implementation of the PCI has had a positive impact among lower class youth, guaranteeing access to their first computers and promoting the sharing of knowledge and digital skills with family members. Moreover, evidence of more diverse and intense use of ICTs among lower class students reveals the development of digital skills related to educational activities. Finally, in terms of sociability, having a personal netbook enables access to information and cultural goods which are very significant in generating ties and strengthening identities and social integration.

Analyzing Multimedia Data: Exploring the Dimensions of Context in ICT for Development Research

Title: Analyzing Multimedia Data: Exploring the Dimensions of Context in ICT for Development Research
Authors: Rajesh Chandwani, Rahul De
Source: The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries
Date (accessed): 18/06/2015
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: information for development, context, multimedia data, qualitative methodology, telemedicine, The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries
It is argued that ICT-for-development interventions should be seen as a dynamic and hybrid network of actors, artefacts, communities, and institutions embedded within the context. Comprehensive understanding of contextual nuances in ICT4D research is thus, an important determinant of quality of research. Scholars have emphasized that qualitative research is opportune in uncovering unique insights and comprehension in a poorly understood and hitherto unexplored arena such as ICT4D interventions in developing countries. While ‘data’ in most of the qualitative research refers to ‘words or textual data’, the advancements in the mobile technology, especially incorporation of compact cameras in the mobile phones, and increasing penetration of mobile phones allow researchers to easily capture multimedia data in their field study. We posit that multimedia data, having multiple dimensions as compared to textual data, enhance the capability of the researchers to understand and explore a specific dimension of qualitative research, namely the contextual dimension, enabling the researcher to undertake a more valid or rigorous investigation of the phenomenon as embedded in the context. By explicating the process of analysis of multimedia data- video recordings of doctor-patient interaction over telemedicine, the authors emphasize that multimedia data analysis can considerably enhance the quality of research in the ICTD domain. In doing so, this paper addresses two important issues related to the methodological issues in qualitative analysis of multimedia data: (1) when and why should the researcher consider collecting multimedia data as opposed to textual data and (2) how should the researcher proceed in analyzing the multimedia data.

Connecting ICTs to Development: The IDRC Experience

Title: Connecting ICTs to Development: The IDRC Experience
Source: IDRC
Date (accessed): 14/06/2015
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This Collection highlights over 15 years of IDRC-supported research through its Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) program, which ended in 2010. IDRC’s Information and Networks program continues to support emerging ICT4D research. A comprehensive analysis of the key findings and lessons learned from the ICT4D program is available as a book — Connecting ICTs to Development: The IDRC Experience. This online companion provides links to additional resources, websites and multimedia, and is organized to follow the book’s structure covering four thematic areas:
- Introduction to ICT4D at IDRC
- Catalyzing access to ICTs
- Sectoral applications of ICTs
- Engaging in ICT4D research

The Plan to 3D Print a Steel Bridge in Mid-Air

Title: The Plan to 3D Print a Steel Bridge in Mid-Air
Author: Maddie Stone
Source: Gizmodo
Date (published): 13/06/2015
Date (accessed): 14/06/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: In two years, a one-of-a-kind construction project will commence over a canal in Amsterdam. It wont involve any humans at all, but rather, a six-axis robot that can craft molten metal in mid-air. Two months later, a 24 foot-long steel pedestrian bridge will arc its way across the water.

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