ICTs and the failure of the Sustainable Development Goals

Title: ICTs and the failure of the Sustainable Development Goals
Author: Tim Unwin
Source: Tim Unwin's Blog - WordPress.com
Date (published): 05/08/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The euphoria associated with the consensus reached by UN member states on 2nd August on the Sustainable Development Agenda to be signed by World Leaders in New York on 25-27 September is fundamentally misplaced, although not unexpected (for process see UN Post-2015 Development Agenda). The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will do little to reduce poverty, will continue to propagate a world system based on inequality, and will continue primarily to serve the interests of those in the UN system and practitioners in the “development industry”.

Radio Days In Afghanistan

Title: Radio Days In Afghanistan
Author: Djaounsede Pardon Madjiangar
Source: WFP | United Nations World Food Programme
Date (published): 24/02/2016
Date (accessed): 02/05/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Getting accurate and reliable market information has always been challenging for farmers living in Afghanistan’s remote rural areas. But a community-based radio is now playing a role in filling the information gap, reducing transaction costs and increasing farmers’ incomes.

Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies

Title: Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies
Author: Jacob Poushter
Source: Pew Research Center
Date (published): 22/02/2016
Date (accessed): 02/05/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: In many advanced economies, the ubiquity of the internet is now a given. It permeates commerce, social interactions, politics, culture and daily life. But this is not the case in all parts of the world. And while internet access continues to grow in poorer nations, there is still a long way to go before the world is completely wired.

The Use of Mobiles in Disasters

Title: The Use of Mobiles in Disasters
Author: Steven Rynecki
Source: Aid & International Development Forum
Date (published): 27/04/2016
Date (accessed): 02/05/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Recent natural and manmade disasters have taught us that resilient communications are vital to saving lives. Available and emerging technologies are evolving to meet the needs of governments, first responders and citizens in better informing all of us about risks and ways to reduce our vulnerability to them. The 2011 Tohoku (Fukushima) disaster brutally demonstrated how unreliable and over-taxed mobile and terrestrial phone networks can be during and immediately after a disaster. And yet there are examples of innovative alternatives that emerged to teach us about communications resilience.

Where are the women of colour in non-profits' tech departments?

Title: Where are the women of colour in non-profits' tech departments?
Author: Mala Kumar
Source: The Guardian
Date (published): 18/04/2016
Date (accessed): 25/04/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Private sector technology companies are dominated by white men, but this doesn’t mean global development tech departments should be.

From the ideal to the real: 20 lessons from scaling up innovations at the World Bank

Title: From the ideal to the real: 20 lessons from scaling up innovations at the World Bank
Author: Soren Gigler
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 20/11/2015
Date (accessed): 25/04/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: On a brisk February morning in 2010, a small group of my World Bank colleagues, a few AidData partners, and I were in brainstorming mode. Our topic of discussion: how we could make a meaningful, measurable difference in making our development projects more open, transparent, and effective. One idea lit us all up: putting development on a map. We envisioned an open platform that citizens around the world could use to look up local development projects and provide direct feedback. We were inspired by “open evangelists” like Beth Novek, Hans Rosling and Viveck Kundra.

People in rural India can now use their phones to access clean water, tuition support

Title: People in rural India can now use their phones to access clean water, tuition support
Author: Britni Danielle
Source: Mashable
Date (published): 11/03/2016
Date (accessed): 25/04/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: m.Paani, a data company that harnesses the power of mobile technology to help Indians earn rewards for in-network shopping (think basic necessities such as food and household goods) that can be traded for other vital things such as water filters or school tuition fee support.

Unpacking Myanmar’s Mobile Phone Gender Gap

Title: Unpacking Myanmar’s Mobile Phone Gender Gap
Source: A4AI - Alliance for Affordable Internet
Date (published): 22/04/2016
Date (accessed): 25/04/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: By March 2015, just over a year after liberalising their ICT sector, 40% of Myanmar’s population between the ages of 15-65 owned a mobile phone. Yet, women were 29% less likely to own a mobile phone than men. To understand the reasons for this gender gap in mobile phone ownership, GSMA and LIRNEasia conducted a qualitative study among 91 men and women in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city, and Pantanaw, a small town in the southwestern part of the country.

Kenyan schools get Digital Literacy Programme devices

Title: Kenyan schools get Digital Literacy Programme devices
Author: Baraka Jefwa
Source: CIO East Africa
Date (published): 08/04/2016
Date (accessed): 25/04/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The Digital Literacy Programme (DLP) has this week (4th to 8th April 2016) delivered and installed devices to an initial four (4) primary schools in different parts of Kenya.

Fixing M&E with Sensors and the Internet of Things

Title: Fixing M&E with Sensors and the Internet of Things
Author: Wayan Vota
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 11/03/2016
Date (accessed): 12/03/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Poverty reduction efforts in many developing countries often take the form of household water filters, community hand-driven water pumps, improved wood, charcoal or kerosene cookstoves, and pit latrines. Improving access to such services could benefit the billions who suffer from diarrheal disease and pneumonia, two of the leading causes of death for children under five globally. However, there remains a significant gap between the stated goals of service providers and their deliverables measured over time. Present-day monitoring metrics of reliability and impact and associated incentives used by funding and implementers agencies are leading to discrepancies in the impact of these programs compared to their initial intent. Remotely reporting instrumentation may help address weakness in measurement objectivity through interventions equipped with sensors that can provide more complete and impartial data in real time.

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