World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends

Title: World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends
Source: The World Bank
Date (accessed): 01/02/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Digital technologies have spread rapidly in much of the world. Digital dividends—that is, the broader development benefits from using these technologies—have lagged behind. In many instances, digital technologies have boosted growth, expanded opportunities, and improved service delivery. Yet their aggregate impact has fallen short and is unevenly distributed. For digital technologies to benefit everyone everywhere requires closing the remaining digital divide, especially in internet access. But greater digital adoption will not be enough. To get the most out of the digital revolution, countries also need to work on the “analog complements”—by strengthening regulations that ensure competition among businesses, by adapting workers’ skills to the demands of the new economy, and by ensuring that institutions are accountable.

Innovative use of Mobile Phones for Profitable Agriculture in rural Uganda; A case of the CELAC project

Title: Innovative use of Mobile Phones for Profitable Agriculture in rural Uganda; A case of the CELAC project
Author: Maria Nakirya
Source: E-Agriculture
Date (published): 07/01/2016
Date (accessed): 13/01/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Sustainable Agriculture designates systems in which the farmers realize the goal of efficient production of safe, high quality agricultural products, in a way that protects and improves the natural environment, the social and economic conditions of farmers, their employees and local communities, and safeguards the health and welfare of all farmed species.

Kenya's smart greenhouse texts when your tomatoes need watering

Title: Kenya's smart greenhouse texts when your tomatoes need watering
Author: Murithi Mutiga
Source: The Guardian
Date (published): 05/01/2016
Date (accessed): 13/01/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Award-winning greenhouses designed by two Kenyan students allow farmers to control temperature, humidity and soil moisture on their mobile phones.

Konga: The Emergence of an African Technology Powerhouse

Title: Konga: The Emergence of an African Technology Powerhouse
Author: Celestine Omin
Source: cyberomin - GitHub
Date (published): 07/01/2016
Date (accessed): 13/01/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This is my first post for the year and I'd thought I'll write on something that I care deeply about, Konga. This is a first in a series of post that will highlight how we have grown as a technology company. From the little days of relying on external tools to survive to the point where we are redefining the African technology scene.

Using Smartphones to Fight Africa’s Second Greatest Killer

Title: Using Smartphones to Fight Africa’s Second Greatest Killer
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 30/12/2015
Date (accessed): 08/01/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Want a fun statistic to share at the watercooler? In Rwanda, a very safe country by regional standards, you are 365 times more likely to be killed in a traffic related death than in the United Kingdom. Don’t do any research on the Central African Republic, you will wonder why authorities let cars in the country at all. This plague of traffic fatalities, the second greatest killer on the continent after HIV/AIDS, is not particularly well understood from a research perspective. What is certain is that the macabre total comes from many converging issues such as new drivers who haven’t had adequate training, increasingly good roads which allows for drivers to go literally breakneck speeds, a construction focus on more tarmac than safety, and inadequate first responder services to the scenes of accidents.

Digital Enablement - Bridging the Digital Divide to Connect People and Society

Title: Digital Enablement - Bridging the Digital Divide to Connect People and Society
Source: Huawei
Date (accessed): 08/01/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: In the future, more connections, sensors, devices, data, video, analytics will lead to even more productive agriculture, healthier individuals, stronger economies, thriving ecosystems, and efficient transport. A new divide between things will accentuate a deeper divide between the people that use them. Precisely because the digital divide is deepening between the digitally enabled and the digitally excluded, it’s never been more urgent to provide digital enablement. Increasing the value of that connection by providing people and organizations with the relevant skills and services is the second necessary step towards digital enablement. Without this the digital divide will actually deepen.
Huawei’s Global Connectivity Index finds that a 20% increase in ICT investment will grow GDP of a country by 1%. The ITU has shown that there is an important relationship between ICT development and other development indicators in developing countries. There are a number of barriers to digital enablement including availability, affordability, attitude and ability, each of which needs to be addressed at three levels: the network connection, the device, and the cloud application.

What If Everyone Had Free 2G Mobile Internet Access?

Title: What If Everyone Had Free 2G Mobile Internet Access?
Author: Steve Song
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 06/01/2016
Date (accessed): 08/01/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Imagine a world where all phones were automatically connected to the Internet, at no charge. Is this an idle fantasy? The current worldwide debate about Zero-Rating and Network Neutrality has brought the issue of affordable Internet access into sharp relief.

Rwandan Entrepreneur’s Solar-Powered Mobile Kiosks Charge Phones, Create Jobs

Title: Rwandan Entrepreneur’s Solar-Powered Mobile Kiosks Charge Phones, Create Jobs
Author: Ann Brown
Source: AFKInsider - African News From a Business Perspective
Date (published): 29/12/2015
Date (accessed): 08/01/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile phones are essential in Rwanda. More than 70 percent of the population owns a one and many people own two or more. Yet, just 22 percent of people have access to electricity, meaning they have trouble charging all these phones, according to the Rwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority.

Using mobile phones to track ongoing trends in food market functionality

Title: Using mobile phones to track ongoing trends in food market functionality
Source: GeoPoll
Date (accessed): 08/01/2016
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: FEWS NET, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network, is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers anticipate humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides objective, evidence-based reporting on more than 36 of the world’s most food insecure countries.
As the Ebola outbreak of 2014 continued to spread, FEWS NET had a need to ram up their ongoing monitoring of food security in the affected countries of Sierra Leone and Liberia. Population movement, quarantine, and other factors had diminished food availability and disrupted markets. However, due to the contagious nature of Ebola, FEWS NET was unable to conduct in-person market assessments in these countries. With an urgent need for data, FEWS NET turned to GeoPoll to conduct remote SMS surveys in Sierra Leone and Liberia. FEWS NET analysts hoped to create a panel of market traders in each country who they could survey on an ongoing basis about market sizes, activities, operating costs, stock levels, and agricultural activates.
The SMS-based survey results serve to corroborate key partner reports on market activities, serve as inputs to FEWS NET’s food security analysis on the impacts of the Ebola outbreak, and are used for emergency planning in response to the outbreak.

5 keys to ICT project success in developing countries

Title: 5 keys to ICT project success in developing countries
Author: Shalini Lagrutta
Source: CIO East Africa
Date (published): 02/01/2016
Date (accessed): 08/01/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: With the data boom in parts of Asia and much of Africa continuing to grow exponentially, business opportunities in the ICT sector have never been more exciting. However, they have probably never been more challenging either, and deployments that would be considered relatively straightforward in much of the western world face more onerous obstacles in the world’s developing nations.

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