eHealth solutions for Africa

Title: eHealth solutions for Africa
Source: Digital Single Market - European Commission
Date (published): 24/06/2016
Date (accessed): 05/07/2016
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Two European projects, recently funded by the Horizon 2020 programme, want to help Africa through the use of digital health solutions. One aims to improve malaria prevention, the other focusses on newborn babies and their mothers.

Rethinking social change: The promises of Web 2.0 for the marginalized

Title: Rethinking social change: The promises of Web 2.0 for the marginalized
Author: Daavid Nemer
Source: First Monday
Date (published): 06/06/2016
Date (accessed): 05/07/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This paper focuses on the uses of Web 2.0 platforms by residents of favelas, urban slums in Brazil, in order to expand our understanding of what Web 2.0 can and cannot do in terms of social change. To explore this problem space, I draw on a 10-month ethnography in the favelas of Vitória, Brazil to study slum residents’ Web 2.0 practices and engagements. I show how Web 2.0 afforded favela residents the ability to protest and cross social boundaries, but when that happened they faced something much stronger: social exclusion, police brutality against the blacks and poor, and limited civic engagement.

Toward Digital Inclusion: Understanding the Literacy Effect on Adoption and Use of Mobile Phones and the Internet in Africa

Title: Toward Digital Inclusion: Understanding the Literacy Effect on Adoption and Use of Mobile Phones and the Internet in Africa
Author: Mariama Deen-Swarray
Source: Information Technologies & International Development
Date (accessed): 05/07/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile phones and the Internet are central components of the information and communication technology (ICT) landscape. ICTs are at the forefront of economic and social inclusion in contemporary societies. The accrued benefits, however, are not being realized fully in some regions. Although access has generally increased across Africa, the extent of adoption and use is suboptimal, thus undermining the role of ICTs in facilitating digital inclusion. This article looks at how three levels of literacy—basic, English-language, and e-skills—might affect adoption and use of mobile phones and the Internet in selected African countries. It sheds light on the role of literacy in the adoption process through evidence-based analysis. The analysis consists of logistic regressions performed on data from 12 African countries surveyed in relation to ICT access and use and supplemented by focus group data from six of these countries. It was found that, on average, both adoption and range of ICT uses correlated with increased basic literacy. Adoption and use increased even more when English-language and/or e-skills literacy were also present.

Making Sense of MOOCs: A Guide for Policy-Makers in Developing Countries

Title: Making Sense of MOOCs: A Guide for Policy-Makers in Developing Countries
Authors: Mariana Patru, Venkataraman Balaji
Source: OAsis - Commonwealth of Learning
Date (published): 06/2016
Date (accessed): 05/07/2016
Type of information: guideline
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The Guide is designed to raise general awareness amongst policy makers in developing countries as to how Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) might address their concerns and priorities, particularly in terms of access to affordable quality higher education and preparation of secondary school leavers for academic as well as vocational education and training. With very few exceptions, many of the reports on MOOCs already published do not refer to the interest and experience of developing countries, although we are witnessing important initiatives in more and more countries around the world.

Digital globalization: The new era of global flows

Title: Digital globalization: The new era of global flows
Authors: James Manyika, Susan Lund, Jacques Bughin, Jonathan Woetzel, Kalin Stamenov, Dhruv Dhingra
Source: McKinsey & Company
Date (published): 02/2016
Date (accessed): 13/06/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The world is more connected than ever, but the nature of its connections has changed in a fundamental way. The amount of cross-border bandwidth that is used has grown 45 times larger since 2005. It is projected to increase by an additional nine times over the next five years as flows of information, searches, communication, video, transactions, and intracompany traffic continue to surge. In addition to transmitting valuable streams of information and ideas in their own right, data flows enable the movement of goods, services, finance, and people. Virtually every type of cross-border transaction now has a digital component.
Lagging countries are closing the gaps with the leaders at a very slow pace, and their limited participation has had a real cost to the world economy. If the rest of the world had increased its participation in global flows at the same rate as the top quartile over the past decade, world GDP would be $10 trillion, or 13 percent, higher today. For countries that have been slow to participate, the opportunities for catch-up growth are too substantial to ignore.

Surprise! Fishermen Using Mobile Phones for Market Prices is the Largest Lie in ICT4D

Title:
Surprise! Fishermen Using Mobile Phones for Market Prices is the Largest Lie in ICT4D

Author: Wayan Vota
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 03/06/2016
Date (accessed): 13/06/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: We all know the story. Fishermen use mobile phones to call ahead to different markets to find the one with best prices, so they can sell their catch for the largest profit. We’ve heard this line a thousand times, and probably have even told it ourselves.
The claim that mobile phones are used to increase fishermen income was first made in academic literature by Robert Jensen in his 2007 paper, The Digital Provide: Information (Technology), Market Performance, And Welfare In The South Indian Fisheries Sector. Google says over 1,077 other academic papers cite this paper. It may be the most cited work in ICT4D academic literature. Sadly, it’s certainly wrong.

Mobile for Development Utilities

Title: Mobile for Development Utilities
Author: Ilana Cohen
Source: GSMA
Date (published): 03/2016
Date (accessed): 13/06/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: GSM sensor-driven maintenance significantly increases average handpump functionality and reduces repair time compared to traditional maintenance models. A longitudinal cohort study was carried out on 181 handpumps divided into the three maintenance models described below. Sensors were equipped on all handpumps to monitor functionality, but only in the ambulance service model did the sensor data inform maintenance operations through alerts.

This is the extent of the demographic digital divide

Title: This is the extent of the demographic digital divide
Author: Keith Breene
Source: The World Economic Forum
Date (published): 22/03/2016
Date (accessed): 13/06/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The growth of the internet is one of the defining characteristics of the modern age. But despite the rapid rise in the number of people online, there are still significant differences between the richest countries and the rest of the world.

Can a Radio Series Change Attitudes and Norms on Violence Against Women?

Title: Can a Radio Series Change Attitudes and Norms on Violence Against Women?
Author: Caroline Hodges
Source: Oxfam - Policy & Practice
Date (published): 05/2016
Date (accessed): 13/06/2016
Type of information: research article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Edutainment is the combination of entertainment—often television or radio soap operas—with educational messages that aim to mobilise and promote positive changes in attitudes, behaviours and social norms. According to the World Bank’s 2015 Development Report, edutainment has the potential to achieve large-scale behaviour change, and many other studies have noted similarly positive results. However, rigorously-gathered evidence of edutainment’s impact on behaviour change is still lacking. Oxfam has implemented edutainment programmes in 14 countries and is constantly seeking to better understand its impact. In 2015, Oxfam Novib’s impact measurement unit conducted a rigorous (randomised) evaluation of an edutainment pilot project in Tunisia.

How ICT4D Research Fails the Poor

Title: How ICT4D Research Fails the Poor
Author: Roger W. Harris
Source: Taylor & Francis Online
Date (published): 27/03/2015
Date (accessed): 16/05/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Research can improve development policies and practices and funders increasingly require evidence of such socioeconomic impact from their investments. This article questions whether information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D) research conforms to the requirements for achieving socioeconomic impact. We report on a literature review of the impact of research in international development and a survey of ICT4D researchers who assessed the extent to which they follow practices for achieving socioeconomic impact. The findings suggest that while ICT4D researchers are interested in influencing both practice and policy, they are less inclined toward the activities that would make this happen, especially engaging with users of their research and communicating their findings to a wider audience. Their institutions do not provide incentives for researchers to adopt these practices. ICT4D researchers and their institutions should engage more closely with the users of their research through more and better communications with the public, especially through the use of information and communication technologies.

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