4 Challenges to Reaching 3.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users by 2020

Title: 4 Challenges to Reaching 3.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users by 2020
Author: Wayan Vota
Source: ICT Works
Date (published): 24/11/2014
Date (accessed): 26/11/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: According to new data released by GSMA Intelligence, 3.8 billion people or half of the world’s population will be using mobile devices to access the Internet by 2020. And where will almost all of the additional mobile Internet users come from? The developing world! Mobile Internet users in the developing world will double from 1.5 billion in 2013 to 3 billion by 2020, rising from 25% today to 45% of the developing world population that will be accessing Internet services and consuming mobile data for everything from email and web browsing, to social networking and online gaming.

Indian Govt launches MyGov portal to crowdsource governance ideas

Title: Indian Govt launches MyGov portal to crowdsource governance ideas
Author: Riddhi Mukherjee
Source: Medianama
Date (published): 31/07/2014
Date (accessed): 26/11/2014
Type of information: Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The Indian government has launched a new online platform called MyGov to encourage citizen participation in governance.

How Open Data can fight poverty and boost prosperity in Kyrgyzstan

Title: How Open Data can fight poverty and boost prosperity in Kyrgyzstan
Author: Victor Mulas
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 25/11/2014
Date (accessed): 26/11/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The Kyrgyz Government has been implementing the Open Government Policy and has already undertaken several measures, such as creating official web portals for state bodies including Open Budget, Electronic Procurement, Foreign Aid and many others. Through these websites, citizens can find information about public services and activities offered by government ministries and other state agencies.

We need a ‘data revolution’ for the urban poor

Title: We need a ‘data revolution’ for the urban poor
Author: Paula Lucci
Source: Post2015.org
Date (published): 10/11/2014
Date (accessed): 26/11/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Last week the UN Independent Expert Advisory Group released its report on the ‘Data Revolution’. Appointed by the Secretary-General, this group looked into how to improve existing data on sustainable development, so that when countries in the General Assembly agree a new set of goals next year, we have better information to monitor them. It’s hard to disagree with the need for better data: accurate and open data is a key building block of effective policy, and a way for citizens to hold governments to account. Yet despite recent improvements in the availability and quality of data, basic information on the poor is still missing or based on imperfect estimates. What’s more, the increasing ambition of a post-2015 agenda to reach the most marginalised and eradicate extreme poverty means that we will need more information for these vulnerable groups than we currently have. The urban poor living in ‘slum’ areas are one such vulnerable group. With their numbers set to increase over coming years, we desperately need more and better data on these communities – but there are some big limitations.

Hungry Planet: Can Big Data Help Feed 9 Billion Humans?

Title: Hungry Planet: Can Big Data Help Feed 9 Billion Humans?
Author: John Roach
Source: NBC News
Date (published): 18/11/2014
Date (accessed): 26/11/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: With a population set to hit 9 billion human beings by 2050, the world needs to grow more food —without cutting down forests and jungles, which are the climate's huge lungs. The solution, according to one soil management scientist, is Big Data. Kenneth Cassman, an agronomist at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, recently unveiled a new interactive mapping tool that shows in fine-grain detail where higher crop yields are possible on current arable land.

The Gender Digital Divide in Developing Countries

Title: The Gender Digital Divide in Developing Countries
Authors: Amy Antonio, David Tuffley
Source: Future Internet - An Open Access Journal from MDPI
Date (published): 31/10/2014
Date (accessed): 12/11/2014
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Empirical studies clearly show that women in the developing world have significantly lower technology participation rates than men; a result of entrenched socio-cultural attitudes about the role of women in society. However, as studies are beginning to show, when those women are able to engage with Internet technology, a wide range of personal, family and community benefits become possible. The key to these benefits is on-line education, the access to which sets up a positive feedback loop. This review gives an overview of the digital divide, before focusing specifically on the challenges women in developing countries face in accessing the Internet. Current gender disparities in Internet use will be outlined and the barriers that potentially hinder women’s access and participation in the online world will be considered. We will then look at the potential opportunities for women’s participation in a global digital society along with a consideration of current initiatives that have been developed to mitigate gender inequity in developing countries. We will also consider a promising avenue for future research.

One-Fifth Of Women In Developing World Countries Think Internet Use Is Inappropriate For Them

Title: One-Fifth Of Women In Developing World Countries Think Internet Use Is Inappropriate For Them
Author: Addy Dugdale
Source: Fast Company
Date (published): 15/01/2013
Date (accessed): 12/11/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A study released by Intel Corporation on women and the Internet has found some interesting trends. Researchers, who consulted with the U.S. State Department and UN Women, found that one-fifth of women in some countries feel that it would be inappropriate for them to use the Internet. The report issues a call to double the number of women and girls online in developing countries from 600 million today to 1.2 billion in 3 years. Around 2,200 women and girls from four countries—India, Egypt, Mexico, and Uganda—took part in the research, which found that 25% of women in developing nations lacked Internet access. In some sub-Saharan countries that figure rises to 45%.

How to Improve Role of Information and Communication Technology for Health Care in Maharashtra State

Title: How to Improve Role of Information and Communication Technology for Health Care in Maharashtra State
Authors: Kalpana Chaudhari, Dr.P.T. Karule
Date (published): 10/2014
Date (accessed): 12/11/2014
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The limited health care budget, chronic shortage of health care workers and lack of incentives to retain those in remote areas further unsatisfied national health care delivery system. Recently, the application of information communication technology (ICT) to health care delivery and the use of telemedicine have raised hopes. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions (e.g. e-health, telemedicine, e-education)are often viewed as vehicles to bridge the digital divide between rural and urban healthcare centres and to resolve shortcomings in the rural health sector. This study focused on challenges, infrastructure, use of ICTs as e-health solutions in rural healthcare centres, Recommendations are made with regard to how ICTs can be used more effectively to improve health rural healthcare centres based on existing state of health care in Maharashtra state.

Remodeling MOOCs in 2014

Title: Remodeling MOOCs in 2014
Source: ICEF Monitor
Date (published): 29/10/2014
Date (accessed): 10/11/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Since the first wave of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) around 2012, hypotheses about their impact have abounded, and have changed over time. So too have emotions about the courses evolved (from excitement to disenchantment or even suspicion) to where we may be now: a calmer state where the both the hype and counter-hype have worn off. Now, organisations are using the essence of MOOCs – an online, adaptable, customisable, and accessible platform – to achieve diverse educational outcomes and business models.

Africa’s urban population growth: trends and projections

Title: Africa’s urban population growth: trends and projections
Authors: Leila Rafei, Mahyar Eshragh Tabary
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 29/10/2014
Date (accessed): 10/11/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: On the periphery of Lagos, Nigeria, lies Makoko, a burgeoning slum community perched on a lagoon. Residents live in makeshift homes on stilts made of collected wood and tarp, and get around primarily by canoe. Once a small fishing village, Makoko now draws migrants from neighboring countries, who flock to Nigeria for low-paying, unskilled jobs. In many ways, Makoko serves as a microcosm of urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa, which has the world’s fastest pace of urban population growth:
​- 6 of the 10 countries with the highest urbanization rates in the world in 2013 are in Sub-Saharan Africa.
- Nigeria itself has the 9th largest urban population in the world, surpassing 80 million in 2013. It also ranks as the country with the most urban dwellers in all of Africa.
- The world’s total urban population reached an estimated 3.8 billion in 2013, and is projected to swell to nearly 6.3 billion in 2050.
- Since 2008, a majority of the world’s population reside in urban areas.

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