Affordable, Simple Tools to Collect Data, Communicate with Clients, and Measure Impact

Title: Affordable, Simple Tools to Collect Data, Communicate with Clients, and Measure Impact
Source: Impact Tracker Technology
Date (accessed): 17/10/2015
Type of information: catalogue
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Organisations are under pressure to measure their performance and results. Many low-cost, information communication technology (ICT) -based tools already exist to help collect data on a large-scale, real-time basis. Yet, while both supply and demand for ICT-based tools exist, nonprofits and social enterprises often fail to take advantage of them. In addition to addressing these gaps, this catalogue goes a step further by providing recommendations that assist users to make decisions in certain categories of tools (i.e. digital data collection apps and SMS communication platforms). Beyond these targeted recommendations, the catalogue displays all relevant research findings so that users can draw their own comparisons.

Helping farmers in identifying problems and improving produce

Title: Helping farmers in identifying problems and improving produce
Author: Neesha Thunga K.
Source: Livemint
Date (published): 06/04/2015
Date (accessed): 17/10/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: CropIn’s app provides climate reports as well as information on diseases, pests and better farm practices.

Global broadband growth slows sharply: 4 billion still offline

Title: Global broadband growth slows sharply: 4 billion still offline
Source: ITU: Committed to connecting the world
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: press release
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Broadband Internet is failing to reach those who could benefit most, with Internet access reaching near-saturation in the world’s rich nations but not advancing fast enough to benefit the billions of people living in the developing world, according to the 2015 edition of the State of Broadband report.

How Text Messaging Curbs Infant Mortality in Africa’s Biggest Urban Slum

Title: How Text Messaging Curbs Infant Mortality in Africa’s Biggest Urban Slum
Author: Ken Banks
Source: National Geographic
Date (published): 09/09/2015
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Almost half of Kenyan mothers do not give birth in a hospital and, thus, receive little professional care or education on basics such as how long to breast feed, what to do in the case of diarrhea and vomiting, or where to go for an emergency. In this issue of Digital Diversity, Cayte Bosler looks at an innovative text messaging service which helps parents differentiate between normal behaviors and signs that something might be wrong.

Using Skype and shoddy internet, overseas psychiatrists support Syria’s internally displaced persons and refugees

Title: Using Skype and shoddy internet, overseas psychiatrists support Syria’s internally displaced persons and refugees
Author: Becky Hagan-Egyir
Source: Makeshift - A field guide to hidden creativity
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Using Skype and shoddy internet, overseas psychiatrists support Syria’s internally displaced persons and refugees.

Students, computers and learning: Where’s the connection?

Title: Students, computers and learning: Where’s the connection?
Author: Andreas Schleicher
Source: OECD Education Today
Date (published): 15/09/2015
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: blog spot
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: As the results from the report show, the connections among students, computers and learning are neither simple nor hard-wired; and the real contributions ICT can make to teaching and learning have yet to be fully realised and exploited. But as long as computers and the Internet have a central role in our personal and professional lives, students who have not acquired basic skills in reading, writing and navigating through a digital landscape will find themselves dangerously disconnected from the economic, social and cultural life around them.

We Are Siblings: Young Innovators Changing Lives

Title: We Are Siblings: Young Innovators Changing Lives
Author: Vania Santoso
Source: Stories of UNICEF Innovation
Date (published): 09/09/2015
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: We Are Siblings is an anti-bullying mentorship project created by students from Bogor Agricultural University (IPB). It won the Global Design for UNICEF Challenge earlier this year. The win meant We Are Siblings received a USD $2,500 grant from UNICEF to pilot their initiative. The pilot saw a team of six mentors from the We Are Siblings team work with 29 children to find innovative ways of dealing with bullying. This was done both in-person and online. In-person sessions involved one mentor working directly with a group of children on anti-bullying modules. Online sessions complemented this, through daily contact via personal messaging apps.

Using Technology to Advance Human Rights in Kenya

Title: Using Technology to Advance Human Rights in Kenya
Source: ICT Works
Date (published): 26/08/2015
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Joseph Kitaka, a resident of Yatta in Machakos County, Kenya, has always had an interest in defending human rights. His community is faced with numerous challenges, including gender-based violence, police brutality and many other human rights violations. Mr. Kitaka had little hope of utilising Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to advance his ambition in bettering his community, until he was elected the chairman of Yatta Paralegal Network, a local Human Rights Network (HURINET). Today, Yatta, is among 15 HURINETs in Kenya that are being supported by the Kenya Human Rights Commission (KHRC) to strengthen democratisation by widening civil society use of ICT to advance political accountability, freedom of expression and respect for human rights. The initiative is part of the ICT4Democracy in East Africa Network, a regional coalition of civil society organisations coordinated by the Collaboration on International ICT Policy for East and Southern Africa (CIPESA).

Technology doesn't make school pupils smarter: study

Title: Technology doesn't make school pupils smarter: study
Source: Yahoo Tech
Date (published): 15/09/2015
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Computers do not noticeably improve school pupils' academic results and can even hamper performance, an OECD report said . While almost three quarters of pupils in the countries surveyed used computers at schools, the report by the the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found technology had made no noticeable improvement in results.

Learning how to harness Information Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D)

Title: Learning how to harness Information Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D)
Source: GOV.UK
Date (published): 27/07/2015
Date (accessed): 23/09/2015
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The ICT4D programme, which was co-funded with Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC), examined the positive and negative impacts that ICT can have on the lives of the poor. Research findings are helping to inform emerging policy that looks to empower the world’s poorest people through technology.

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