Is India’s $3.60 smartphone too good to be true?

Title: Is India’s $3.60 smartphone too good to be true?
Author: Prasanto K Roy
Source: BBC
Date (published): 18/02/2016
Date (accessed): 12/03/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: On Wednesday evening a virtually unknown Indian company launched the "world's cheapest smartphone", named Freedom 251, for 251 rupees ($3.60; £2.50), in Delhi. The handset, from Ringing Bells, a company less than a year old and based in Noida near the capital, Delhi, is a 3G smartphone with specifications similar to phones at least 15 times more expensive.

The Mobile Health Paradox: Why Data Isn’t Nearly Enough

Title: The Mobile Health Paradox: Why Data Isn’t Nearly Enough
Author: Yusuf Sherwani
Source: TechCrunch
Date (published): 10/02/2016
Date (accessed): 05/03/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Across most developed economies, healthcare costs are rising faster than inflation. In the U.K., the National Health Service (NHS) faces an estimated funding gap of £30 billion by 2020. In the U.S., the situation looks more bleak, with total annual healthcare spending surpassing $3.8 trillion, representing an astonishing 17.4 percent of the country’s total GDP.

How mobile can help smallholder farmers become more climate resilient

Title: How mobile can help smallholder farmers become more climate resilient
Author: Nicole Darabian
Source: GSMA
Date (published): 18/02/2016
Date (accessed): 05/03/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This is the first entry of a series of blog posts highlighting the opportunities and benefits for mobile operators to invest in weather forecasting provision. This blog post focuses on the opportunity to improve the dissemination of weather information.

There are 9 principles for digital development. Now what?

Title: There are 9 principles for digital development. Now what?
Author: Kelli Rogers
Source: Devex International Development
Date (published): 01/03/2016
Date (accessed): 05/03/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract:
1. Design with the user.
2. Understand the existing ecosystem.
3. Design for scale.
4. Build for sustainability.
5. Be data driven.
6. Use open standards, open data, open source and open innovation.
7. Reuse and improve.
8. Address privacy and security.
9. Be collaborative.

5 ways to include women in a mobile-enabled energy solution

Title: 5 ways to include women in a mobile-enabled energy solution
Author: Alexandra Tyers
Source: Panoply Digital
Date (accessed):05/03/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: There’s a lot of evidence that women not only have less access to affordable, clean and renewable energy services than men (for example, because of social norms around financing and access to electrical connections) but also are disproportionately affected by low-quality energy. For example, women and girls are much more likely to have health problems because of cooking indoors with low-quality fuels such as kerosene and generating indoor air pollution. There is also the question of safety.

Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies

Title: Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies
Author: Jacob Poushter
Source: Pew Research Center
Date (published): 22/02/2016
Date (accessed): 29/02/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, both economically and socially, technology adoption remains one of the defining factors in human progress. To that end, there has been a noticeable rise over the past two years in the percentage of people in the emerging and developing nations surveyed by Pew Research Center who say that they use the internet and own a smartphone. And while people in advanced economies still use the internet more and own more high-tech gadgets, the rest of the emerging world is catching up.
In 2013, a median of 45% across 21 emerging and developing countries reported using the internet at least occasionally or owning a smartphone. In 2015, that figure rose to 54%, with much of that increase coming from large emerging economies such as Malaysia, Brazil and China. By comparison, a median of 87% use the internet across 11 advanced economies surveyed in 2015, including the U.S. and Canada, major Western European nations, developed Pacific nations (Australia, Japan and South Korea) and Israel.2 This represents a 33- percentage-point gap compared with emerging and developing nations.

Top 10 Education Apps for Africa

Title: Top 10 Education Apps for Africa
Author: Darryl Linington
Source: IT News Africa
Date (published): 25/02/2016
Date (accessed): 29/02/2016
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: IT News Africa is highlighting some of the top education apps for Africa. The apps featured below offer users the opportunity to learn new languages, discover various facts about global history, as well as brush up on their math and science knowledge.

Mobile Banking – Adoption and Challenges in Nigeria

Title: Mobile Banking – Adoption and Challenges in Nigeria
Author: Simon N.P.Nwankwo, Onwuka Ifeanyi Onuka
Source: SEAHI Publications and Academic Journals
Date (accessed): 29/02/2016
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile banking or m-banking is becoming a prominent feature in banking operations in Nigeria with more and more banks adopting this technology in order to provide the growing population of their customers with fast, accessible, reliable and quality services. The technology of mobile banking has emerged as a possible powerful provider of bundle of banking services. The mobile banking system involves the use of a mobile device (e.g. phone) to pay for goods or services either at the point of sale or conduct of banking transactions anywhere and anytime. The study evaluated the attitude of bank customers towards the adoption of M-banking services and challenges of mobile phone in conducting banking transactions in Nigeria with analytical focus on Enugu State. The survey research approach was adopted and data were collected from 200 respondents that include bank staff and customers of selected banks in Enugu metropolis. The analysis of data was conducted using descriptive statistical technique. The study revealed that the level of adoption of mobile banking in Enugu State is still low among the middle aged respondents compared to the aged. A massive awareness program to publicize the purpose and benefits derivable from the use of mobile banking should be encouraged. This, it is hoped, will boost the level of adoption of mobile banking services because of the convenience and accessibility offered by this banking platform.

How WhatsApp is fuelling a 'sharing revolution' in Sudan

Title: How WhatsApp is fuelling a 'sharing revolution' in Sudan
Author: Khalid Albaih
Source: The Guardian
Date (published): 15/10/2015
Date (accessed): 17/02/2016
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Amid a government crackdown on the press, the app is helping politically charged residents share news and views without fear.

The Digital Landscape: Technology and Land Rights

Title: The Digital Landscape: Technology and Land Rights
Source: Land Tenure and Property Rights Portal
Date (published): 11/02/2016
Date (accessed): 17/02/2016
Type of information: recorded webinar
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Innovative tools and emerging technologies in the land sector offer new potential to improve the lives of women and men around the world. Rapid developments in technology are making it possible to solve development challenges in ways that seemed impossible just a few short years ago. Tools—such as smartphone apps that help people map and certify land; an open-source database that connects farmers, pastoralists and scientists across the globe; and participatory mapping programs that help clarify and secure tenure in customary settings—are making it easier for governments and local communities to efficiently manage land and resources and for individuals to understand and exercise their property rights.

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