A Review of Education and ICT Indicators in Central Asia (by UNESCO Bangkok)

Title: A Review of Education and ICT Indicators in Central Asia (by UNESCO Bangkok)
Source: UNESCO Bangkok
Date (published): 23/03/2015
Date (accessed): 08/01/2016
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The region of Central Asia includes five independent republics – Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan – all of which used to be part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) that was dissolved in 1991 (UNESCO, 2008). With similar historical backgrounds, the people of the Central Asian republics have much in common in terms of culture and languages. The region has been constantly making significant progress in areas such as primary school enrolment and gender parity levels since the Education for All (EFA) goals were adopted in 2000 as governments recognised the critical role of education in socio-economic development, social cohesion and national prosperity. Although there have been constant debates on the accuracy of the data, the Central Asian countries have shown their achievement in overall youth and adult literacy rates of more than 99%. Furthermore, all five countries have reported to have achieved a gender parity index (GPI) of 1. The GPI is an indicator that is commonly used to assess gender differences through the computation of the ratio of female-to-male values and gender parity is reached when GPI is between 0.97 and 1.03.

Drones set to give global farming a makeover

Title: Drones set to give global farming a makeover
Author: Caspar van Vark
Source: The Guardian
Date (published): 26/12/2015
Date (accessed): 28/12/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: From Sri Lanka to Uganda, UAVs with near-infrared sensors are monitoring plants for pests and disease, with implications for agricultural policy worldwide.

6 ways to strengthen consumer voice in water and sanitation sector through ICT platforms

Title: 6 ways to strengthen consumer voice in water and sanitation sector through ICT platforms
Author: Fadel Ndaw
Source: The Water Blog - Worldbank Blogs
Date (published): 16/10/2015
Date (accessed): 28/12/2015
Type of information: research study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A new study was recently carried out by the Water Global Practice’s Water and Sanitation Program on how to unlock the potential of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) to improve Water and Sanitation Services in Africa. The study suggests that promoting public participation and creating a system of transparency and accountability is critical to improve water and sanitation services to the poor – as identified in earlier studies on the characteristics of well-performing public water utilities. The experiences and lessons learned from the study indicate the following six key ways on how to support the design and implementation of ICT tools to strengthen consumer voice and citizen engagement in the water and sanitation sector.

Information Society Observatory Newsletter, December 2015

Table of contents

In focus: Mobile Health Information System in action
In underdeveloped rural regions, access to up to date information via internet may be severely restricted, due to the cumulative effects of various factors. Computer prices and internet subscription costs are unaffordably high for regions living in deprivation.

Highlighted articles
- Measuring the Information Society Report 2015
- Why we need a global partnership to end modern slavery
- Introducing the Civil Registration and Vital Statistics Digitization Guidebook
- Insights on developing an organizational ICT4D strategy
- Why Do Evaluations of e-Health Programs Fail?
- Crowdfunding in Emerging Markets: Lessons from East African Startups
- Ensuring Developing Countries Benefit from Big Data

New documents in the Observatory
In this chapter you can find a list of every new item which has been added to the Observatory in the last period.

The downloadable newsletter in pdf format:
Newsletter

Chennai after the deluge: How social media came to the rescue

Title: Chennai after the deluge: How social media came to the rescue
Author: Krish Ashok
Source: Livemint - Mint on Sunday
Date (published): 13/12/2015
Date (accessed): 20/12/2015
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The inside story on how 200 volunteers banded together to lend a helping hand in a drowning city.

Harnessing the power of digital health to eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission

Title: Harnessing the power of digital health to eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission
Authors: Edward Bitarakwate, Hima Batavia
Source: Devex International Development
Date (published): 11/12/2015
Date (accessed): 20/12/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Every year in Uganda, nearly 91,000 babies are born to HIV-infected mothers and risk starting their lives with a deadly disease. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV accounts for 21 percent of the total HIV transmission cases in the country. Despite these figures, it’s important to remember that mother-to-child transmission is entirely preventable. In fact, simply through monitoring and tracking the delivery of a proven set of health interventions, the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is very possible. Digital health tools are helping to make eMTCT not just possible but also likely. Last week’s World AIDS Day marked a critical moment to explore how digital health can build essential connections among pregnant women, health facilities, health providers, and stewards of national health systems to ensure no newborns fall through the cracks.

Engaging Citizens: A Review of Eight Approaches to Civic Engagement

Title: Engaging Citizens: A Review of Eight Approaches to Civic Engagement
Author: Shannon McHarg
Source: User Experience Magazine
Date (published): 11/2015
Date (accessed): 20/12/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Twenty years ago, Robert Putnam wrote about the rise of “bowling alone,” a metaphor for people participating in activities as individuals instead of groups that can lead to community. This led to the decline in social capital in America. The problem of individual participation as opposed to community building has become an even bigger problem since the invention of smartphones, the Internet as the source of all information, social networking, and asynchronous entertainment.

An Uber for dirty laundry - and other apps changing Uganda

Title: An Uber for dirty laundry - and other apps changing Uganda
Author: Akwasi Sarpong
Source: BBC
Date (published): 15/12/2015
Date (accessed): 20/12/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Like much of Africa, Uganda has a vibrant technology and start-up scene. Some of the technology being developed is geared towards e-commerce and creating jobs, but others are using their computer-programming skills to create tools to solve Uganda's development challenges.

Testing BRCK’s Digital Education in Northern Kenya

Title: Testing BRCK’s Digital Education in Northern Kenya
Source: WhiteAfrican
Date (published): 15/12/2015
Date (accessed): 20/12/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Northern Kenya has always felt like it’s a different country, most Kenyans don’t seem to get north of Isiolo and it really is a forgotten place. This was made clear two years ago when we were on our Turkana Eclipse expedition and a man told us, “when you get to Kenya, tell them…” This week finds us up in Northern Kenya again with our education solution from BRCK, called the Kio Kit (video). We figured that if we were going to get some real value out of seeing how people use it, let’s go to somewhere far away that has a great deal of challenges, but also never gets anything tested there. Our “Made in Kenya” expedition takes us up to Samburu and Marsabit counties.

Interview with Paul Wilson, Director General of Asia Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC)

Title: Interview with Paul Wilson, Director General of Asia Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC)
Source: Bytes for All Bangladesh
Date (published): 14/12/2015
Date (accessed): 20/12/2015
Type of information: interview
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Paul Wilson has 25 years’ involvement with the Internet, and over 16 years as the head of APNIC, the Regional Internet address Registry for the Asia Pacific. In this role, he has led APNIC’s development as a provider of critical Internet services and as a key contributor to Internet growth and development throughout the Asia Pacific. Paul has worked as an expert and leader across the full range of communities and organisations involved in Internet development, including ISPs and network operators, non-profit organisations, Governments and governmental agencies; and with many key organisations including RIRs, IETF, ICANN, ISOC, APEC-TEL, ITU and others. Previously as Technical Director and CEO of Pegasus Networks, the first private ISP in Australia, Paul worked with early Internet technologies, and helped to establish many early Internet services in developing economies of the region.

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