OLPC

One Laptop Per Child vs. Intel Classmate

Title: One Laptop Per Child vs. Intel Classmate
Author: symbolmanipulator
Source: Wordpress
Date (published): 23/03/2014
Date (accessed): 24/03/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The big news in my feed recently was around One Laptop Per Child and whether it was dead or not. Why the sudden debate?

One Laptop Per Child CEO Responds to Flap: “We Have Achieved Our Goals”

Title: One Laptop Per Child CEO Responds to Flap: “We Have Achieved Our Goals”
Author: Wade Roush
Source: Xconomy
Date (published): 20/03/2014
Date (accessed): 21/03/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: When MIT Media Lab founder Nicholas Negroponte announced to the world in 2005 that his new One Laptop Per Child initiative would produce $100 laptops for students in poor nations, the resulting hullabaloo—a mixture of shock, skepticism, and enthusiasm—went on for several years. It was impossible to build a useful computer for that price, cynics said. But it could revolutionize the way millions of children learn, supporters said.

Is the One Laptop Per Child Enough? Viewpoints from Classroom Teachers in Rwanda

Title: Is the One Laptop Per Child Enough? Viewpoints from Classroom Teachers in Rwanda
Author: Ayodeji A. Fajebe, Michael L. Best, Thomas N. Smyth
Source: ITID
b>Date (accessed): 08/01/2014
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This study examines the implementation of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program in Rwanda from the viewpoint of primary school teachers involved with the program. It seeks to understand how these teachers feel about the program, how they incorporate the low-cost laptops into their classrooms, and their impressions of the laptops’ impacts on their students. Results of the study reveal that the teachers like the initiative, but recognize many challenges in adapting the program to their realities. The teachers think of the initiative primarily as a computer literacy and rote learning project, and they report outcomes along these lines. Beyond learning computer skills, the teachers note that the program has had both positive and negative impacts on several students—some have become more empowered as learners, and some have become rude and disruptive in class. Most significantly, the teachers often view themselves, and not their students, as the primary users of the laptops, and they have found ways to employ the laptops for both personal and school-related work.

Kenya’s free laptops to be delivered in 90 days, officials to visit shortlisted firms

Title: Kenya’s free laptops to be delivered in 90 days, officials to visit shortlisted firms
Author: Nick Sato
Source: HumanIPO
Date (published): 07/01/2014
Date (accessed): 08/01/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Kenya’s flagship one laptop per child programme will commence in the next three months as government officials from the Ministry of Education are set to travel abroad to assess shortlisted firms for the procurement of the 1.3 million laptops.

Given Tablets but No Teachers, Ethiopian Children Teach Themselves

Title: Given Tablets but No Teachers, Ethiopian Children Teach Themselves
Author: David Talbot
Source: MIT Technology Review
Date (published): 29/10/2012
Date (accessed): 18/11/2012
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: With 100 million first-grade-aged children worldwide having no access to schooling, the One Laptop Per Child organization is trying something new in two remote Ethiopian villages—simply dropping off tablet computers with preloaded programs and seeing what happens. The goal: to see if illiterate kids with no previous exposure to written words can learn how to read all by themselves, by experimenting with the tablet and its preloaded alphabet-training games, e-books, movies, cartoons, paintings, and other programs.

OLPC Project Puts Tablets In The Hands Of Formerly Illiterate Children With Amazing Results

Title: OLPC Project Puts Tablets In The Hands Of Formerly Illiterate Children With Amazing Results
Author: John Biggs
Source: Techcrunch
Date (published): 01/11/2012
Date (accessed): 05/11/2012
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The researchers were expecting the children to play with the boxes and potentially open them in the first week. Instead they turned them on in less than an hour and a few months later were modifying the settings and singing ABC songs. It was, at once, a triumph of technology and of the human capacity to learn.

OLPC: Una forma de imperialismo / A form of imperialism

Title:OLPC: Una forma de imperialismo / A form of imperialism
ISSN: 1853-3302
Source: Síntesis Educativa
Date (published): 25/01/2011
Date (accessed): 18/09/2011
Type of information: interview
Language: Spanish / English (via Google Translate)
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
"Síntesis Educativa: Profesor Winner, ¿cuál es su evaluación del modelo "una computadora por alumno" en términos pedagógicos, y de las propuestas de Nicholas Negroponte contenidas en su programa OLPC?
Langdon Winner:En tanto el modelo educativo contenido en "una computadora por alumno" y otros programas similares puede parecer nuevo e "innovador", se trata tan sólo de la muestra más reciente de una muy antigua obsesión, un acercamiento que ya ha fracasado repetidamente. En su libro "Maestros y Máquinas", Larry Cuban, profesor de Educación en la Universidad de Stanford, explica el patrón que viene aplicándose hace décadas. Primero aparecen los comerciantes con un nuevo producto para vender: películas, grabaciones, televisión, computadoras, etcétera. Le llevan sus productos a los burócratas educativos y los convencen de que se aproxima una "revolución tecnológica" y que es su deber ser parte de ella. Luego, los administradores escolares compran las máquinas, a menudo con enorme sacrificio, y las imponen a las escuelas de sus jurisdicciones. En la mayoría de los casos, los maestros, los alumnos y las personas en las escuelas y en las comunidades son instruídas sobre los cambios que se avecinan. OLPC reproduce fielmente este terrible patrón, donde la tecnología educativa es promovida no porque haya una clara idea sobre su valor para la enseñanza o el aprendizaje, sino por la promesa de un mercado lucrativo. Muchos maestros son absorbidos porque quieren aparentar "estar al día"."
See the original here: Una forma de imperialismo

"Educational Summary: Professor Winner, what is your assessment of the model "one computer per student" in pedagogical terms, and Nicholas Negroponte Ni proposals contained in the OLPC?
Langdon Winner: While the educational model contained in "one computer per student" and other similar programs may seem new and "innovative", this is just the latest example of a very old obsession, an approach that has failed repeatedly . In his book "Teachers and Machines", Larry Cuban, professor of education at Stanford University, explains the pattern that has been in place for decades. Traders appear first with a new product to sell movies, recordings, television, computers, etc.. They bring their products to educational bureaucrats and convince them that it is approaching a "technological revolution" and that it is his duty to be part of it. Then, school administrators buy the machines, often with great sacrifice, and imposed on schools in their jurisdictions. In most cases, teachers, students and people in schools and communities are educated about the changes ahead. OLPC terrible reproduces this pattern, where educational technology is promoted not because he has a clear idea of ​​its value for teaching or learning, but by the promise of a lucrative market. Many teachers are absorbed because they want to appear "up to date.""
See the original here: A form of imperialism (Google Translate)

via https://twitter.com/#!/rosamariatorres

Rwanda: Schools' Laptop Project Gets Security Feature

Title: Rwanda: Schools' Laptop Project Gets Security Feature
Author: Frank Kanyesigye
Source: allAfrica.com
Date (published): 08/07/2011
Date (accessed): 22/07/2011
Type of information: article
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
"The Ministry of Education, through the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) project has installed a security feature to protect the laptops from theft.

Speaking to The New Times yesterday, the National OLPC Coordinator at the Ministry, Nkubito Bakuramutsa, said that all 65,000 laptops currently in circulation countrywide, will be fitted with a re-flash security software.

He stated that the security software will ensure that the laptops are used in a more effective manner, adding that the feature has triggered the current exercise of visiting schools, checking the laptops, recapturing serial numbers as well as repairing faulty ones.

Bakurumutsa disclosed that the activation of laptops began last week in the Southern Province and will continue until the entire country is covered.

So far, 124 schools and over 61,000 children use of laptops, countrywide."

One-to-one computing in Latin America & the Caribbean

Title: One-to-one computing in Latin America & the Caribbean
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: EduTech
Publisher: The World Bank Group
Date (published): 21/06/2011
Date (accessed): 13/07/2011
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
"A recent paper from Eugenio Severin and Christine Capota of the Inter-american Development Bank (IDB) surveys an emerging set of initiatives seeking to provide children with their own educational computing devices. While much of the popular consideration of so-called "1-to-1 computing programs" has focused on programs in the United States, Canada, Western Europe and Australia, One-to-One Laptop Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean: Panorama and Perspectives provides a useful primer for English-speaking audiences on what is happening in middle and low income countries like Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela."

Frustrations with One Laptop Per Child Initiative

Title: Frustrations with One Laptop Per Child Initiative
Author: Sam Lanfranco
Source: OLPC News
Date (published): 18/06/2010
Date (accessed): 20/06/2010
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
I have been working in the ICT area since the late 1970's - hence my userID of "lanfran" from back when email names were unix restricted to less than 8 characters. I am a big supporter of (proper) ICT4DEV, yet it was clear from the start that the OLPC strategy was flawed.

There were questions and issues raised when the project was first proposed, and those questions and issues are still being raised. OLPC has never felt it necessary to address the criticisms other than paint a rosy picture of what (maybe) could be done if OLPC could actually saturate developing countries with its computer.

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