Kenya

Why M-Pesa Outperforms Other Developing Country Mobile Money Schemes

Title: Why M-Pesa Outperforms Other Developing Country Mobile Money Schemes
Author: Richard Heeks
Source: ICTs for development
Date (published): 24/11/2012
Date (accessed): 26/11/2012
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Why has M-Pesa been so successful in Kenya, yet mobile money initiatives in other developing countries much less so? Recent Centre for Development Informatics research can help provide a systematic response.

Open government in Africa

Title: Open government in Africa
Authors: Chris R. Albon
Source: New Europe Post online
Date (published): 23/09/2012
Date (accessed): 11/10/2012
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: In 2011 the Kenyan government launched a first for Africa: a national open data project. Called The Kenya Open Data Initiative (KODI), the program would eventually release over 400 government datasets on everything from education to sanitation.

Kenya to tax M-Pesa transactions

Title: Kenya to tax M-Pesa transactions
Author: Craig Wilson
Source: Techcentral
Date (published): 08/10/2012
Date (accessed): 09/10/2012
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: M-Pesa, which has more than 14m subscribers in Kenya, could be forced to increase transaction costs by 10% as East African nation’s treasury looks to impose a levy on transactions made using the mobile money transfer service.

Kenya Case Studies in e-Payments

Title: Kenya Case Studies in e-Payments
Author: Loretta Michaels
Source: Accenture Development Partners under the Global Broadband Initiative
Pages: 19 pp.
Date (published): 15/11/2011
Date (accessed): 27/09/2012
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This document describes four case studies on the use of mobile money in Kenya, covering use by a government ministry (The Ministry of Lands), an NGO implementing partner of USAID (PACT), a governmental non-­‐profit institution (Kenya National Examinations Council), and a small microfinance institution that provides financing and technical advisory services (Juhudi Kilimo).

Are Innovation Hubs the Future of Open Government In Africa?

Title: Are Innovation Hubs the Future of Open Government In Africa?
Author: Chris R. Albon
Source: Techpresident
Date (published): 18/09/2012
Date (accessed): 19/09/2012
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: That year the Kenyan government launched a first for Africa: a national open data project. Called The Kenya Open Data Initiative (KODI), the program would eventually release over 400 government datasets on everything from education to sanitation.

Mobile Money for the Unbanked

Title: Mobile Money for the Unbanked
Author: Claire Penicaud
Source: GSMA
Date (published): 06/09/2012
Date (accessed): 13/09/2012
Type of information: online article (two parts)
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: About the opportunity of using mobile money to provide microcredit and on why Micro Finance Institutions (MFIs) should be using mobile money.

Cell phones replace wallets in Kenya

Title: Cell phones replace wallets in Kenya
Author: Alfred Kiti
Source: DW
Date (published): 12/09/2012
Date (accessed): 13/09/2012
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Life hasn't been the same in Kenya since phone provider Safaricom introduced M-Pesa in 2007. The mobile phone-based money transfer system is the most popular on the African continent.

Open Data Kenya : Case Study of the Underlying Drivers, Principal Objectives and Evolution of one of the first Open Data Initiatives in Africa (Long Version)

Title: Open Data Kenya : Case Study of the Underlying Drivers, Principal Objectives and Evolution of one of the first Open Data Initiatives in Africa (Long Version)
Authors: Hanif Rahemtulla, Jeff Kaplan, Björn-Sören Gigler, Samantha Cluster, Johannes Kiess, Charles Brigham
Pages: 45 pp.
Source: Open Development Technology Alliance
Publisher: The World Bank
Date (published): 13/12/2011
Date (accessed): 15/12/2011
Type of information: Draft
Language: English
On-line access: yes (pdf)
Abstract:
"In July 2011, Kenya become one of the first African countries and 22nd internationally to launch an Open Data initiative, making over 160 government datasets freely available through a publicly accessible online portal. The initiative is expected to support greater public transparency and accountability, fundamentally changing the nature of citizen-government interaction. The release of public data online creates a platform supporting the development of third-party applications, enabling a vehicle for expanded public outreach and engagement leading to “a more responsive and citizen-focused government” (Madera, 2009).

This paper outlines underlying drivers, principal objectives and the evolution of the Kenya Open Data Initiative from inception to realisation. A comparative study of Kenya Open Data and related US and UK initiatives is included, highlighting implications for the applicability of a ‘default model’ in developing countries. This paper also provides preliminary insights into the platform’s access and usage patterns since the launch, as well as perceived present and future impact of this initiative in Kenya. Finally, it outlines the vision moving forward describing the principal barriers and supportive factors that must be addressed for the effective use of public sector information in Kenya.  Adopting a mixed-mode research design, the study draws upon surveys, observational data and interviews conducted with key actors."

SMS for Violence Prevention: PeaceTXT International Launches in Kenya

Title: SMS for Violence Prevention: PeaceTXT International Launches in Kenya
Author: Patrick Meier
Source: iRevolution blog
Date (published): 12/12/2011
Date (accessed): 14/12/2011
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
"One of the main reasons I’m in Nairobi this month is to launch PeaceTXT International with PopTech, Praekelt Foundation, Sisi ni Amani and several other key partners. PeaceTXT International is a spin-off from the original PeaceTXT project that several of us began working on with CeaseFire Chicago last year.

The purpose of PeaceTXT is to leverage mobile messaging to catalyze behavior change around peace and conflict issues. In the context of Chicago, the joint project with CeaseFire aims to leverage SMS reminders to interrupt gun violence in marginalized neighborhoods. Several studies in other fields of public health have already shown the massive impact that SMS reminders can have on behavior change, e.g., improving drug adherence behavior among AIDS and TB patients in Africa, Asia and South America.

Our mobile messaging campaign in Chicago builds on another very successful one in the US: “Friends Don’t Let Friends Drink and Drive.” Inspired by this approach, the PeaceTXT Team is looking to launch a friends-don’t-let-friends-get-killed campaign.

Note that CeaseFire has been directly credited for significantly reducing the number of gun-related killings in Chicago over the past 10 years. In other words, they have a successful and proven methodology; one being applied to several other cities and countries worldwide. PeaceTXT simply seeks to scale this success by introducing SMS.

In the meantime, PeaceTXT is partnering with Sisi ni Amani (We are Peace) to launch its first international pilot project. Rachel Brown, who spearheads the initiative, first got in touch with me back in the Fall of 2009 whilst finishing her undergraduate studies at Tufts. Rachel was interested in crowdsourcing a peace map of Kenya, which I blogged about here shortly after our first conversation. Since then, Rachel and her team have set up the Kenyan NGO Sisi ni Amani Kenya (SnA-K) to leverage mobile technology for awareness raising and civic engagement with the aim of preventing possible violence during next year’s Presidential Elections..."

Kenyans use social media to mobilize support for drought victims

Title: Kenyans use social media to mobilize support for drought victims
Author: Kingsley Ighobor
Source: Bulawayo24
Date (published): 13/11/2011
Date (accessed): 14/11/2011
Type of information:
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
"...In July, as thousands of starving people walked across the border from Somalia into the Dadaab refugee camp in northeastern Kenya, there were also thousands of Kenyans dying of drought in that region, as well as in Turkana, Pokot and Baringo. Ms. Gichuru and other journalists covered that reality. "I went to the camp and saw children just screaming. It was deafening. Some had just died. Some were about to die, and I saw parents standing helplessly, just preparing to dig another infant grave," she told Africa Renewal.

The interventions of Ms. Gichuru and others have been acclaimed for both the sheer effort — more than $67 million donated so far by ordinary Kenyans and some companies — and the tools with which the mobilization has been carried out: Facebook, Twitter, mobile phones, television, radio and newspapers.

Reactions to the various media reports were swift and spontaneous. The Media Owners Association, Safaricom (one of the country's leading mobile phone companies) and the Kenya Red Cross continue to rally donations and other relief materials under the aegis of Kenyans for Kenya, an association officially launched in late July.

"The response by Kenyans was overwhelming and humbling, hitting KSh19 million through M-Pesa [mobile banking] contributions on the second day," reports The Standard, a leading Kenyan newspaper. Ms. Gichuru says that they collected the equivalent of about $10 million within two weeks.

How does it work? Safaricom assigned a dedicated account number that people with mobile phones can easily remember (111 111). Subscribers pay into their M-Pesa accounts, much as they do when adding to their phone calling credits. To make a donation they simply enter the amount and send it to the dedicated account number. Both the sender and the recipient promptly get SMS messages confirming the transaction. The ease of transactions has contributed to the project's success.

The credibility of the main implementing partner, the Kenya Red Cross, further encourages people to donate. "Once people knew who was going to spend the money, they felt more comfortable to contribute," says Ms. Gichuru."

Syndicate content