education

Cellphones ignite a 'reading revolution' in poor countries

Title: Cellphones ignite a 'reading revolution' in poor countries
Author: Amar Toor
Source: The Verge
Date (published): 23/04/2014
Date (accessed): 11/05/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: There is evidence to suggest that mobile technology can improve literacy test scores, though UNESCO's study focuses on the behaviors and demographics of users in developing countries, in the hopes of better understanding how and why they read. More than 62 percent of those surveyed said they enjoy reading more after they started reading on mobile devices, and one-third said they use their phones to read to their children (an additional third said they would do so if more child-friendly books were available). The survey also shed light on important gender-based differences. Although the vast majority of mobile readers are male (77 percent), women actually devote far more time to reading: 277 minutes per month, on average, compared to just 33 minutes for men.

Using mobile phones to collect data in the education sector in Uganda

Title: Using mobile phones to collect data in the education sector in Uganda
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 22/04/2014
Date (accessed): 11/05/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A blog post about the education sector of Uganda, and about collecting valid data about the sector, beside these information about "U-report", a free mobile SMS-based tool.

5 Key Barriers to Educational Technology Adoption in the Developing World

Title: 5 Key Barriers to Educational Technology Adoption in the Developing World
Author: Clayton R. Wright
Source: Educational Technology Debate
Date (published): 04/2014
Date (accessed): 10/05/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Educational technology will continue to be implemented incrementally in many parts of the developing world. More rapid uptake and success are unlikely to occur unless five items are addressed – power, Internet connectivity and bandwidth, quality teacher training, respect and better pay for teachers, and the sustainability of implementations.

Microsoft to transform learning in Rwanda

Title: Microsoft to transform learning in Rwanda
Source: IT News Africa
Date (published): 07/03/2014
Date (accessed): 10/03/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Microsoft and the Ministry of Education Republic of Rwanda have signed an agreement to transform learning, further innovation and develop employment skills among students and educators in Rwanda, through Microsoft’s Partners in Learning programme.

A 'mobile first' approach to educational technology

Title: A 'mobile first' approach to educational technology
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: World Bank Blogs
Date (published): 28/02/2014
Date (accessed): 03/03/2014
Type of information: presentation
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: 'Mobile dmobiles moving about ... but to what end?evices' are increasingly to be found in schools, and utilized for learning purposes, around the world. In most cases, related discussions taking place in ministries of education focus on the use of portable tablets and small laptops as complements to, and extenders of, existing approaches to the use of technology to help meet a whole host of education and learning objectives. At the same time, mobile devices of many other sorts -- most notably the mobile phone -- are proliferating at a much greater rate in larger society. Linkages between the devices being used outside of schools, and the technology to be found within schools, are often quite tenuous, where they exist at all.

Interactive Educational Television in the Amazon

Title: Interactive Educational Television in the Amazon
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: World Bank Blogs
Date (published): 12/02/2014
Date (accessed): 13/02/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This initiative was born out of an effort that began in 2002 in Amazonas to train unqualified teachers (Proformar) in rural areas that led to a teaching certificate. Based on the success of that initiative, and its model, planning for this project began in earnest in 2004. In 2007 it started in high school classrooms, and in 2009 it was expanded to middle schools. Here are some quick figures related to the reach of the project: 2007: 10k students, 260 classrooms, 200 schools, serving 334 communities. 2013: 38k students, 1809 classrooms, 400 schools, serving 2400 communities. All of this has been done using existing municipal facilities (schools), which underwent minor refurbishment.

Sterio.me - A Mobile Learning Technology for Primary/Secondary Educators in Africa aims to launch in Nigeria

Title: Sterio.me - A Mobile Learning Technology for Primary/Secondary Educators in Africa aims to launch in Nigeria
Author: Kenneth Omeruo
Source: TechTrends
Date (published): 12/02/2014
Date (accessed): 13/02/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Technology has increasingly changed the way we learn.For Africa especially Nigeria, with the rapid increase in the use of mobile phones and the growth in Mobile Internet, Technology enhanced learning will no doubt offer great opportunity for the nation. One of such technologies set to empower and improve learning for Primary and Secondary Schools in Africa is Sterio.me which is to be launched in Nigeria soon.

Mobile Learning Week: A Revolution for Inclusive & Better Education

Title: Mobile Learning Week: A Revolution for Inclusive & Better Education
Source: UNESCO - The United Nations Organization for Education, Science and Culture
Date (published): 07/02/2014
Date (accessed): 10/02/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: How do we make educational materials accessible to a girl from a poor family in Africa where over 50% of her female peers will never go to school? How can we get books into the hands of the poorest people on Earth? The answer, at least in the immediate term, is mobile devices – and more precisely, mobile phones. Mobile devices are the most successful and ubiquitous information and communication technology in human history. They are plentiful in places where books and schools are scarce.

The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students' Digital Skills in Peru

Title: The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students' Digital Skills in Peru
Authors: Bet, Germán; Cristia, Julian P.; Ibarrarán, Pablo
Source: Inter-American Development Bank
Date (accessed): 06/02/2014
Type of information: research paper
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This paper analyzes the effects of increased shared computer access in secondary schools in Peru. Administrative data are used to identify, through propensity-score matching, two groups of schools with similar observable educational inputs but different intensity in computer access. Extensive primary data collected from the 202 matched schools are used to determine whether increased shared computer access at schools affects digital skills and academic achievement. Results suggest that small increases in shared computer access, one more computer per 40 students, can produce large increases in digital skills (0. 3 standard deviations). No effects are found on test scores in Math and Language.

Online teaching platform launched in Nigeria

Title: Online teaching platform launched in Nigeria
Source: IT News Africa
Date (published): 30/01/2014
Date (accessed): 31/01/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: With the growing emphasis on quality education in Nigeria, it has become imperative that robust technological systems be built to support the sector.

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