education

ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya

Title: ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya
Source: IT News Africa
Date (published): 27/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The ICT Authority and Microsoft have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which will, among other things, see Microsoft offer support in providing a platform that will enable ICT skills training for up to 300 000 teachers.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. The solution to this dilemma may surprise you.

FarmDrive: A Young Woman in ICT4Ag – A Case Study

Title: FarmDrive: A Young Woman in ICT4Ag – A Case Study
Author: Peris Bosire
Source: CTA - The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
Date (published): 23/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is very often perceived as a male-dominated field. But CTA's experience through the Agriculture, Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society (ARDYIS) project, has shown quite a different picture.

8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women

Title: 8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women
Author: Alexandra Tyers
Source: ICTworks
Date (published): 17/04/2015
Date (accessed): 20/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Tigo Biashara is one of two mobile education services that GSMA Connected Women has awarded grants to – the other one is an English skill development service in Bangladesh, aimed improving employability prospects for rural adolescent girls through lessons delivered on voice and SMS platforms, and developed by BRAC Bangladesh in partnership with Robi Axiata.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 15/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. When it comes to education, it's rural Sub-Saharan Africa that needs a revolution most: 56 million people aged 15-24 in haven't completed primary school, while 774 million people - two-thirds of them women - cannot read or write. With an estimated 635 million mobile phone subscriptions currently in the region, many are pinning their hopes on mobile technologies such as free online learning materials, math apps and offline encyclopedias to help tackle the problems.

The Rumie Initiative: Using Tablets As Learning Tools In Ebola-Stricken Communities

Title: The Rumie Initiative: Using Tablets As Learning Tools In Ebola-Stricken Communities
Author: Federico Guerrini
Source: Broadband Commission
Date (published): 12/11/2014
Date (accessed): 01/02/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Although less than 1% of the population has been diagnosed with Ebola, to tackle the outbreak and avoid spreading the disease, Liberia’s Government has shut down all schools in July, leaving 1.4 million children with no education for over 4 months now. To lend a hand and help kids continue their schooling, a Toronto-based tech startup called the Rumie Initiative is raising money on Indiegogo to send in the country $50 tablets pre-loaded with educational content. The devices can be used by the children to self-teach themselves, or in communities with the help of a tutor.

Demystifying the MOOC

Title: Demystifying the MOOC
Author: Jeffrey J. Selingo
Source: The New York Times
Date (published): 29/10/2014
Date (accessed): 06/01/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: When massive open online courses first grabbed the spotlight in 2011, many saw in them promise of a revolutionary force that would disrupt traditional higher education by expanding access and reducing costs. The hope was that MOOCs — classes from elite universities, most of them free, in some cases enrolling hundreds of thousands of students each — would make it possible for anyone to acquire an education, from a villager in Turkey to a college dropout in the United States. Following the “hype cycle” model for new technology products developed by the Gartner research group, MOOCs have fallen from their “peak of inflated expectations” in 2012 to the “trough of disillusionment.”

What Are MOOCs Good For?

Title: What Are MOOCs Good For?
Author: Justin Pope
Source: MIT Technology Review
Date (published): 15/12/2014
Date (accessed): 30/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Online courses may not be changing colleges as their boosters claimed they would, but they can prove valuable in surprising ways.

The Gender Digital Divide in Developing Countries

Title: The Gender Digital Divide in Developing Countries
Authors: Amy Antonio, David Tuffley
Source: Future Internet - An Open Access Journal from MDPI
Date (published): 31/10/2014
Date (accessed): 12/11/2014
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Empirical studies clearly show that women in the developing world have significantly lower technology participation rates than men; a result of entrenched socio-cultural attitudes about the role of women in society. However, as studies are beginning to show, when those women are able to engage with Internet technology, a wide range of personal, family and community benefits become possible. The key to these benefits is on-line education, the access to which sets up a positive feedback loop. This review gives an overview of the digital divide, before focusing specifically on the challenges women in developing countries face in accessing the Internet. Current gender disparities in Internet use will be outlined and the barriers that potentially hinder women’s access and participation in the online world will be considered. We will then look at the potential opportunities for women’s participation in a global digital society along with a consideration of current initiatives that have been developed to mitigate gender inequity in developing countries. We will also consider a promising avenue for future research.

In Africa, smartphones and tablets are real alternatives to text books

Title: In Africa, smartphones and tablets are real alternatives to text books
Author: Alberto B. Sáez
Source: Mobile World Capital
Date (published): 27/10/2014
Date (accessed): 31/10/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The In South Africa, one of the countries with the best prospects in the region, the average family spends 1.800 Rands per year on textbooks, almost 130 euros or 164 US dollars; an excessive amount for income often below 4,000 euros per year. If we bear in mind that other countries in the area have among the lowest disposable incomes in the world, it is easy to understand why price is a determining factor and why these mobile devices have been considered as an alternative from the outset. A low-end tablet costs about 100 euros and a high quality one with a 10-inch screen a little less than 200 euros. This means that in one school year the investment could be paid off on something that can be used way beyond mere school work ; it is a window on the world. This fact has convinced the government of the Ivory Coast, which has agreed to provide 5,000 tablets dedicated primarily to education in public schools.

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