education

Demystifying the MOOC

Title: Demystifying the MOOC
Author: Jeffrey J. Selingo
Source: The New York Times
Date (published): 29/10/2014
Date (accessed): 06/01/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: When massive open online courses first grabbed the spotlight in 2011, many saw in them promise of a revolutionary force that would disrupt traditional higher education by expanding access and reducing costs. The hope was that MOOCs — classes from elite universities, most of them free, in some cases enrolling hundreds of thousands of students each — would make it possible for anyone to acquire an education, from a villager in Turkey to a college dropout in the United States. Following the “hype cycle” model for new technology products developed by the Gartner research group, MOOCs have fallen from their “peak of inflated expectations” in 2012 to the “trough of disillusionment.”

What Are MOOCs Good For?

Title: What Are MOOCs Good For?
Author: Justin Pope
Source: MIT Technology Review
Date (published): 15/12/2014
Date (accessed): 30/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Online courses may not be changing colleges as their boosters claimed they would, but they can prove valuable in surprising ways.

The Gender Digital Divide in Developing Countries

Title: The Gender Digital Divide in Developing Countries
Authors: Amy Antonio, David Tuffley
Source: Future Internet - An Open Access Journal from MDPI
Date (published): 31/10/2014
Date (accessed): 12/11/2014
Type of information: academic article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Empirical studies clearly show that women in the developing world have significantly lower technology participation rates than men; a result of entrenched socio-cultural attitudes about the role of women in society. However, as studies are beginning to show, when those women are able to engage with Internet technology, a wide range of personal, family and community benefits become possible. The key to these benefits is on-line education, the access to which sets up a positive feedback loop. This review gives an overview of the digital divide, before focusing specifically on the challenges women in developing countries face in accessing the Internet. Current gender disparities in Internet use will be outlined and the barriers that potentially hinder women’s access and participation in the online world will be considered. We will then look at the potential opportunities for women’s participation in a global digital society along with a consideration of current initiatives that have been developed to mitigate gender inequity in developing countries. We will also consider a promising avenue for future research.

In Africa, smartphones and tablets are real alternatives to text books

Title: In Africa, smartphones and tablets are real alternatives to text books
Author: Alberto B. Sáez
Source: Mobile World Capital
Date (published): 27/10/2014
Date (accessed): 31/10/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The In South Africa, one of the countries with the best prospects in the region, the average family spends 1.800 Rands per year on textbooks, almost 130 euros or 164 US dollars; an excessive amount for income often below 4,000 euros per year. If we bear in mind that other countries in the area have among the lowest disposable incomes in the world, it is easy to understand why price is a determining factor and why these mobile devices have been considered as an alternative from the outset. A low-end tablet costs about 100 euros and a high quality one with a 10-inch screen a little less than 200 euros. This means that in one school year the investment could be paid off on something that can be used way beyond mere school work ; it is a window on the world. This fact has convinced the government of the Ivory Coast, which has agreed to provide 5,000 tablets dedicated primarily to education in public schools.

How is ICT improving education in East Africa?

Title: How is ICT improving education in East Africa?
Source: SOS Children's Villages
Date (published): 27/08/2014
Date (accessed): 30/08/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: As internet access and computer skills become ever more important tools for getting information, services and ensuring employability, governments are seeking to equip schools with modern technology. With digital know-how, it is hoped children will leave school prepared for tomorrow's world and able to participate in knowledge economies. A myriad of initiatives are working towards these goals, including ICT4D (Information, Communication and Technology for Development) projects by SOS Children. To understand better the potential of ICT in the classroom and how it can help students to succeed, the SOS Children show ustwo examples from East Africa.

How may ICT in basic education help reach global development goals?

Title: How may ICT in basic education help reach global development goals?
Source: Norad
Date (published): 14/07/2014
Date (accessed): 21/08/2014
Type of information: report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: International experts on ICT in education joined Norad’s Education Section in May 2014 for a discussion on best practices and opportunities ahead. A 17-page illustrated report on the seminar gives useful insight. Until now, authorities have increased school enrolment mainly by expanding services to reach many, but not all. In addition, many children receive education of poor quality. Globally 250 million children can neither read nor write when they start fourth grade. This may be partially explained by the large increase in children starting school not being matched by raised number of teachers, classrooms and educational material. There is a major shortage of teachers, and especially of qualified ones. The seminar addresses ICT in teacher education and how technology may boost learning in basic education.

Fighting Against Knowledge Poverty with Educational Tablets

Title: Fighting Against Knowledge Poverty with Educational Tablets
Author: Albert A. Ninyeh
Source: Infoboxx
Date (published): 13/08/2014
Date (accessed): 21/08/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: There have been multiple attempts in the past couple of years by African companies to market African-designed tablets.

Changing Education Through ICT in Developing Countries

Title: Changing Education Through ICT in Developing Countries
Edited by: Georgsen, Marianne; Zander, Par-Ola
Published by: Aalborg University Press
ISBN: 9788771120790
Pages: 213
Date (accessed): 21/08/2014
Type of information: book
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This book discusses how information and communication technology (ICT) can play a vital role in developing education and therefore developing communities, countries, and regions. Through examples of current research in developing countries, a number of highly relevant questions and topics are dealt with, such as: approaches to user involvement and participation in development * knowledge and its role in development, particularly in higher education * digital literacy and ways of developing it * pedagogic approaches * learning cultures in globalized education * teacher training and education. The chapters are written by members of the international research group on ICT for Development (ICT4D) at Aalborg University, together with researchers from around the world. The book concentrates fully on the relationship between ICT and development in the context of education. It will be essential reading for researchers, educational planners, policy advisers, students, and educators.

Worst practice in ICT use in education

Title: Worst practice in ICT use in education
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 30/04/2010
Date (accessed): 01/08/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Online article about some worst practices in the field of using ICT in education.

#MOOC for development report #ict4D

Title: #MOOC for development report #ict4D
Author: Inge Ignatia de Waard
Source: @Ignatia Webs
Date (published): 30/07/2014
Date (accessed): 01/08/2014
Type of information: conference report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The conference on MOOC4D was held in April 2014 and it focused on the challenges and potentials of MOOCs in developing countries. The conference existed of panel discussions on various MOOC topics. The 18 page report gives a very nice insight into potential bottlenecks and the status of MOOCs in developing regions.

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