education

Arabic MOOC platform Edraak launches to bring quality education to the region

Title: Arabic MOOC platform Edraak launches to bring quality education to the region
Author: Hayden Pirkle
Source: Wamda
Date (published): 15/06/2014
Date (accessed): 24/06/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: While English-language MOOC platforms such as edX, Coursera, and Udacity have gained traction across the globe, an Arabic MOOC has yet to gain a significant foothold. Launched two weeks ago in Amman, Edraak is the first pan-Arab initiative of the Queen Rania Foundation for Education and Development (QRF) of its kind, and seeks to make quality education more accessible for a population that is thirsty for both additional and higher quality educational opportunities.

Far From a Threat, MOOCs Could Help Solve the B-School Diversity Problem

Title: Far From a Threat, MOOCs Could Help Solve the B-School Diversity Problem
Author: Cory Weinberg
Source: Businessweek
Date (published): 03/06/2014
Date (accessed): 24/06/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A study written by three University of Pennsylvania researchers and published in the Harvard Business Review analyzed the demographics of the more than 875,000 students enrolled in nine business courses that Penn’s Wharton School offered for free online. International students and underrepresented minorities account for a disproportionate number of those enrolled in Wharton’s MOOCs, unlike traditional MBA programs, the researchers found. This suggests that those populations have an interest in business education that traditional programs are not tapping.

Why It's So Hard to Close the Digital Divide in High-Poverty Schools

Title: Why It's So Hard to Close the Digital Divide in High-Poverty Schools
Author: Sarah Garland
Source: NBC News
Date (published): 12/06/2014
Date (accessed): 24/06/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: When it comes to speedy Internet access in schools, which technology advocates say will be critical to ensuring that American students stay competitive globally, Philadelphia is way ahead of many districts across the country.

Tablets swapped for ‘smart classrooms’

Title: Tablets swapped for ‘smart classrooms’
Author: Lamphai Intathep
Source: Bangkok Post
Date (published): 18/06/2014
Date (accessed): 22/06/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The Office of the Basic Education Commission (Obec) has confirmed plans to replace the One Tablet per Child scheme with "smart classrooms" equipped with interactive computer software in every school.

Schools ill-equipped to teach computer skills, study says

Title: Schools ill-equipped to teach computer skills, study says
Author: Bekezela Phakathi
Source: Business Day LIVE
Date (published): 13/06/2014
Date (accessed): 22/06/2014
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A research report has painted a sorry picture of South African schools’ readiness to teach e-learning, finding most teachers are not trained in computer skills.

Top 10 Lessons From ICT4E Projects in Kenya

Title: Top 10 Lessons From ICT4E Projects in Kenya
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 18/06/2014
Date (accessed): 22/06/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Back in 2010, the Pontis Foundation launched with one primary and one secondary pilot school in Taita -Taveta County financed by SlovakAid. Their first focus was merely ICT integration, but now besides computer skills and ICT Clubs, their top priority is Business Studies improvement through student practice companies.

10 ways to realise the potential of e-learning

Title: 10 ways to realise the potential of e-learning
Author: Holly Young
Source: The Guardian
Date (published): 10/06/2014
Date (accessed): 13/06/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Can e-learning really deliver an education revolution across the globe? Thoughts of a panel of experts.

Raspberry Pi for Learning Initiative (Pi4L)

Title: Raspberry Pi for Learning Initiative (Pi4L)
Source: Stories of UNICEF Innovation
Date (published): 08/05/2014
Date (accessed): 13/05/2014
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: UNICEF Lebanon is investigating innovative ways to provide non-formal education to the millions of displaced children as a result of the Syrian crisis. Recent studies have highlighted the scale of the crisis and put forward some recommendations on what can be done. Innovation has a major role to play in addressing the need for basic education. The Pi4L programme is built around four learning tracks delivered both offline and via small computer labs (1 – 10 nodes). Three of the tracks are optimised for students and one is focused on teachers and teacher-trainers. The learning platform will be built on a Raspberry Pi hardware/software combination that includes distributions of Raspbian (the operating system) and associated teaching software together with dedicated content curated for primary, secondary and remedial students. The system will be optimized for offline delivery such that at the most basic level it can function as a content and continuing education delivery tool.

Cellphones ignite a 'reading revolution' in poor countries

Title: Cellphones ignite a 'reading revolution' in poor countries
Author: Amar Toor
Source: The Verge
Date (published): 23/04/2014
Date (accessed): 11/05/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: There is evidence to suggest that mobile technology can improve literacy test scores, though UNESCO's study focuses on the behaviors and demographics of users in developing countries, in the hopes of better understanding how and why they read. More than 62 percent of those surveyed said they enjoy reading more after they started reading on mobile devices, and one-third said they use their phones to read to their children (an additional third said they would do so if more child-friendly books were available). The survey also shed light on important gender-based differences. Although the vast majority of mobile readers are male (77 percent), women actually devote far more time to reading: 277 minutes per month, on average, compared to just 33 minutes for men.

Using mobile phones to collect data in the education sector in Uganda

Title: Using mobile phones to collect data in the education sector in Uganda
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 22/04/2014
Date (accessed): 11/05/2014
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A blog post about the education sector of Uganda, and about collecting valid data about the sector, beside these information about "U-report", a free mobile SMS-based tool.

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