education

Lens turns smartphone into a microscope: Costs only 3 cents

Title: Lens turns smartphone into a microscope: Costs only 3 cents
Source: ScienceDaily
Date (published): 04/05/2015
Date (accessed): 18/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Researchers have created an optical lens that can be placed on an inexpensive smartphone to magnify images by a magnitude of 120, all for just 3 cents a lens.

Mobile app helps teachers to support literacy efforts

Title: Mobile app helps teachers to support literacy efforts
Source: Development Innovations Cambodia
Date (accessed): 08/05/2015
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Each year Cambodian schools struggle to recruit enough teachers to meet the growing school-age population. The average student-teacher ratio is approximately 46 to one, with classrooms in some provinces exceeding 62 students per instructor. The shortage is particularly acute in primary schools. In order to mitigate the critical shortage of teachers and promote strong foundations for literacy in Grades 1 & 2, World Education’s Technology for Education Systems Transformation project (TEST) developed a mobile application that automates student reading assessments using mobile tablet computers.

ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya

Title: ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya
Source: IT News Africa
Date (published): 27/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The ICT Authority and Microsoft have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which will, among other things, see Microsoft offer support in providing a platform that will enable ICT skills training for up to 300 000 teachers.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. The solution to this dilemma may surprise you.

FarmDrive: A Young Woman in ICT4Ag – A Case Study

Title: FarmDrive: A Young Woman in ICT4Ag – A Case Study
Author: Peris Bosire
Source: CTA - The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
Date (published): 23/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is very often perceived as a male-dominated field. But CTA's experience through the Agriculture, Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society (ARDYIS) project, has shown quite a different picture.

8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women

Title: 8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women
Author: Alexandra Tyers
Source: ICTworks
Date (published): 17/04/2015
Date (accessed): 20/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Tigo Biashara is one of two mobile education services that GSMA Connected Women has awarded grants to – the other one is an English skill development service in Bangladesh, aimed improving employability prospects for rural adolescent girls through lessons delivered on voice and SMS platforms, and developed by BRAC Bangladesh in partnership with Robi Axiata.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 15/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. When it comes to education, it's rural Sub-Saharan Africa that needs a revolution most: 56 million people aged 15-24 in haven't completed primary school, while 774 million people - two-thirds of them women - cannot read or write. With an estimated 635 million mobile phone subscriptions currently in the region, many are pinning their hopes on mobile technologies such as free online learning materials, math apps and offline encyclopedias to help tackle the problems.

The Rumie Initiative: Using Tablets As Learning Tools In Ebola-Stricken Communities

Title: The Rumie Initiative: Using Tablets As Learning Tools In Ebola-Stricken Communities
Author: Federico Guerrini
Source: Broadband Commission
Date (published): 12/11/2014
Date (accessed): 01/02/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Although less than 1% of the population has been diagnosed with Ebola, to tackle the outbreak and avoid spreading the disease, Liberia’s Government has shut down all schools in July, leaving 1.4 million children with no education for over 4 months now. To lend a hand and help kids continue their schooling, a Toronto-based tech startup called the Rumie Initiative is raising money on Indiegogo to send in the country $50 tablets pre-loaded with educational content. The devices can be used by the children to self-teach themselves, or in communities with the help of a tutor.

Demystifying the MOOC

Title: Demystifying the MOOC
Author: Jeffrey J. Selingo
Source: The New York Times
Date (published): 29/10/2014
Date (accessed): 06/01/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: When massive open online courses first grabbed the spotlight in 2011, many saw in them promise of a revolutionary force that would disrupt traditional higher education by expanding access and reducing costs. The hope was that MOOCs — classes from elite universities, most of them free, in some cases enrolling hundreds of thousands of students each — would make it possible for anyone to acquire an education, from a villager in Turkey to a college dropout in the United States. Following the “hype cycle” model for new technology products developed by the Gartner research group, MOOCs have fallen from their “peak of inflated expectations” in 2012 to the “trough of disillusionment.”

What Are MOOCs Good For?

Title: What Are MOOCs Good For?
Author: Justin Pope
Source: MIT Technology Review
Date (published): 15/12/2014
Date (accessed): 30/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Online courses may not be changing colleges as their boosters claimed they would, but they can prove valuable in surprising ways.

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