information accessibility

ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya

Title: ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya
Source: IT News Africa
Date (published): 27/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The ICT Authority and Microsoft have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which will, among other things, see Microsoft offer support in providing a platform that will enable ICT skills training for up to 300 000 teachers.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. The solution to this dilemma may surprise you.

How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake

Title: How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake
Author: Timo Luege
Source: Social Media for Good
Date (published): 26/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Following earthquake in Nepal, Facebook activated “Safety Check“, a feature that helps friends and relatives quickly find out whether their loved ones are safe.

How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake

Title: How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake
Author: Timo Luege
Source: Social Media for Good
Date (published): 26/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Following earthquake in Nepal, Facebook activated “Safety Check“, a feature that helps friends and relatives quickly find out whether their loved ones are safe.

8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women

Title: 8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women
Author: Alexandra Tyers
Source: ICTworks
Date (published): 17/04/2015
Date (accessed): 20/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Tigo Biashara is one of two mobile education services that GSMA Connected Women has awarded grants to – the other one is an English skill development service in Bangladesh, aimed improving employability prospects for rural adolescent girls through lessons delivered on voice and SMS platforms, and developed by BRAC Bangladesh in partnership with Robi Axiata.

It Took India Almost 10 Years To Realise That Women Empowerment Is Possible Through ICT

Title: It Took India Almost 10 Years To Realise That Women Empowerment Is Possible Through ICT
Author: Ram Kaushik
Source: GroundReport
Date (published): 15/03/2015
Date (accessed): 15/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The year was 2006 when Praveen Dalal suggested the use of ICT for Women Empowerment in India (PDF). However, it took almost 10 years for India to realise that women empowerment is possible though ICT. Narendra Modi government has finally appreciated this fact and has introduced the Digital India project covering this aspect as well. However, there are many limitations and shortcomings of Digital India project of India as on date and with these limitations and shortcomings the effect of Digital India would not be as conducive as anticipated.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 15/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. When it comes to education, it's rural Sub-Saharan Africa that needs a revolution most: 56 million people aged 15-24 in haven't completed primary school, while 774 million people - two-thirds of them women - cannot read or write. With an estimated 635 million mobile phone subscriptions currently in the region, many are pinning their hopes on mobile technologies such as free online learning materials, math apps and offline encyclopedias to help tackle the problems.

Why developing nations love and hate the internet

Title: Why developing nations love and hate the internet
Source: The Times of India
Date (published): 20/03/2015
Date (accessed): 02/04/2015
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: People in emerging economies see the internet as a good thing for education and the economy, but worry about its impact on morality, a global survey showed. The Pew Research Center survey showed a median of 64% of respondents in 32 emerging and developing nations say the internet is a positive for education. A majority also see the internet as a good influence on personal relationships and the economy, but offer a mixed view on other impacts.

Can standardised hashtags be effective in emergency responses?

Title: Can standardised hashtags be effective in emergency responses?
Author: Jessica MacLean
Source: ReliefWeb
Date (published): 24/03/2015
Date (accessed): 31/03/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: After the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, a study found that social media platforms, especially Twitter, were extremely beneficial during the disaster to citizens and widely used by most directly affected individuals. While the Japanese Government was not as active on Twitter during the 2011 disaster, relief and volunteer organisations were and found social media to the most reliable source of information during the disaster. The Government of the Philippines was one of the first governments to standardise and use hashtags on Twitter to disseminate information and respond to urgent needs during Typhoon Bopha in 2012. Standardised hashtags can be used by governments and aid organisations to distribute information to the public, and respond to urgent needs and requests. The hashtags should be used interactively, coordinated and collaborated with between the sectors. Twitter users then tweet with the respective hashtags to notify governments and aid agencies about needs of affected communities and urgent requests.

Challenging innovators to find new ways to make disaster risk information accessible to all

Title: Challenging innovators to find new ways to make disaster risk information accessible to all
Author: Alanna Simpson
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 13/03/2015
Date (accessed): 19/03/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Sometimes the impacts of disasters seem difficult to predict, such as when the heavy snow that set off deadly avalanches in Afghanistan this winter also damaged transmission lines, disrupting the flow of electricity imported from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan and resulting in power outages in Kabul. Other times the consequences seem almost inevitable, for example the likelihood of a devastating earthquake in the Ganges Basin of India, Nepal and Bangladesh within our lifetime. There are, however, tools and models that allow us to determine the potential impacts of a disaster before they happen, and provide decision-makers with information they can use to reduce the potential impact.

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