information accessibility

Can standardised hashtags be effective in emergency responses?

Title: Can standardised hashtags be effective in emergency responses?
Author: Jessica MacLean
Source: ReliefWeb
Date (published): 24/03/2015
Date (accessed): 31/03/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: After the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, a study found that social media platforms, especially Twitter, were extremely beneficial during the disaster to citizens and widely used by most directly affected individuals. While the Japanese Government was not as active on Twitter during the 2011 disaster, relief and volunteer organisations were and found social media to the most reliable source of information during the disaster. The Government of the Philippines was one of the first governments to standardise and use hashtags on Twitter to disseminate information and respond to urgent needs during Typhoon Bopha in 2012. Standardised hashtags can be used by governments and aid organisations to distribute information to the public, and respond to urgent needs and requests. The hashtags should be used interactively, coordinated and collaborated with between the sectors. Twitter users then tweet with the respective hashtags to notify governments and aid agencies about needs of affected communities and urgent requests.

Challenging innovators to find new ways to make disaster risk information accessible to all

Title: Challenging innovators to find new ways to make disaster risk information accessible to all
Author: Alanna Simpson
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 13/03/2015
Date (accessed): 19/03/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Sometimes the impacts of disasters seem difficult to predict, such as when the heavy snow that set off deadly avalanches in Afghanistan this winter also damaged transmission lines, disrupting the flow of electricity imported from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan and resulting in power outages in Kabul. Other times the consequences seem almost inevitable, for example the likelihood of a devastating earthquake in the Ganges Basin of India, Nepal and Bangladesh within our lifetime. There are, however, tools and models that allow us to determine the potential impacts of a disaster before they happen, and provide decision-makers with information they can use to reduce the potential impact.

Supporting women's agro-enterprises in Africa with ICT : a feasibility study in Zambia and Kenya

Title: Supporting women's agro-enterprises in Africa with ICT : a feasibility study in Zambia and Kenya
Source: The World Bank
Date (published): 01/02/2015
Date (accessed): 07/03/2015
Type of information: research paper
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A new generation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) is finding a small foothold among poor, small-scale farmers in developing countries. Even so, many barriers still prevent poor rural people from accessing, using, and benefiting from new ICT tools and platforms, and those barriers are arguably higher for rural women. The relationship between gender and agriculture has been studied intensively over the years, and many agricultural interventions now include gender as a crosscutting issue or “mainstream” gender throughout their operations. Studies of the relationship between gender and the use of ICTs in agriculture have started to appear only quite recently, however. The Africa Region of the World Bank views ICTs as potentially transformative technology for rural development and seeks to incorporate the use of ICTs throughout its portfolio of projects. The present study was designed to examine the feasibility of integrating ICTs into two large investment programs: the Irrigation Development and Support Project (IDSP) in Zambia and the Kenya Agricultural Productivity and Agribusiness Project (KAPAP). The specifi c goal was to examine how ICT-based interventions might be designed to strengthen women’s participation in commodity value chains under the two projects.

Kids teaching kids to read - how free cloud services from Microsoft are helping to preserve and celebrate local languages

Title: Kids teaching kids to read - how free cloud services from Microsoft are helping to preserve and celebrate local languages
Source: Microsoft in Education Blog
Date (published): 22/02/2015
Date (accessed): 04/03/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This is the challenge that UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) posed to us approximately 30 months ago. The ability to read and write your own language is a basic human right - however, illiteracy remains the number one educational challenge facing the world at present. One in every four adults on the planet is functionally illiterate (of whom two thirds are women) and an estimated 75 million girls are absent from the classroom. And the challenge for those who speak a minority language - for whom there is a significant shortage of textbooks - is even more pressing. Working in partnership with The Reading and Writing Foundation led by Princess Laurentien of The Netherlands (UNESCO Global Envoy on Literacy), the partnership brokering agency Collaborative Impact and a fantastic developer partner called Terawe - we began to develop a set of Windows Azure services which allows anyone, anywhere to write and publish a literacy text in any language. We named the service Chekhov after the famous Russian writer, who provided for his family during long years of hardship by publishing short stories in magazines and journals.

UNESCO launches a new publication on the role of Internet intermediaries

Title: UNESCO launches a new publication on the role of Internet intermediaries
Source: Unesco
Date (published): 19/01/2015
Date (accessed): 02/02/2015
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: “Fostering Freedom Online: the Role of Internet Intermediaries” is the title of a new title in the UNESCO Internet freedom series. With the rise of Internet intermediaries that play a mediating role on the internet between authors of content and audiences, UNESCO took a joint initiative, with the Open Society Foundations, the Internet Society, and Center for Global Communication Studies at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication, to examine this recent historical phenomenon and how it impacts on freedom of expression and associated fundamental rights such as privacy.

Focus on Gender: Farming app is out of touch with reality

Title: Focus on Gender: Farming app is out of touch with reality
Source: SciDev.Net
Date (published): 29/01/2015
Date (accessed): 02/02/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Nepali women are becoming more involved in farming, but there is a mobile phone gender gap. Nepal’s mountains and a lack of electricity also hinder mobile phone initiatives. Tech projects targeting women in remote areas must first tackle access barriers.

The Rumie Initiative: Using Tablets As Learning Tools In Ebola-Stricken Communities

Title: The Rumie Initiative: Using Tablets As Learning Tools In Ebola-Stricken Communities
Author: Federico Guerrini
Source: Broadband Commission
Date (published): 12/11/2014
Date (accessed): 01/02/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Although less than 1% of the population has been diagnosed with Ebola, to tackle the outbreak and avoid spreading the disease, Liberia’s Government has shut down all schools in July, leaving 1.4 million children with no education for over 4 months now. To lend a hand and help kids continue their schooling, a Toronto-based tech startup called the Rumie Initiative is raising money on Indiegogo to send in the country $50 tablets pre-loaded with educational content. The devices can be used by the children to self-teach themselves, or in communities with the help of a tutor.

Why high-speed internet is a weapon against Ebola

Title: Why high-speed internet is a weapon against Ebola
Author: Lauren Woodman, Kristin Peterson
Source: The World Economic Forum
Date (published): 23/01/2015
Date (accessed): 01/02/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: For many health workers battling the Ebola crisis in West Africa, they don’t have to imagine – it has often been a daily reality. Before receiving high-speed internet, it could take a health worker in Port Loko, Sierra Leone an hour to send an email containing lab results. A phone call to order supplies could cost US $5 per minute. An employee at an Ebola treatment unit in N’zerekore, Guinea had to drive to a nearby town every day just to send status updates to colleagues in the capital city of Conakry.

Free USAID Course: How To Use Mobile Data Solutions for Better Development Outcomes

Title: Free USAID Course: How To Use Mobile Data Solutions for Better Development Outcomes
Source: ICT Works
Date (published): 16/01/2015
Date (accessed): 22/01/2015
Type of information: online course
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Leading global development organizations are just beginning to utilize mobile technologies to improve the efficiency and quality of the data they collect, manage, analyze, and share. However, there is so much more the international development community could be doing with this powerful technology to make better decisions and meet broader global development goals.

Where Cellular Networks Don’t Exist, People Are Building Their Own

Title: Where Cellular Networks Don’t Exist, People Are Building Their Own
Author: Lizzie Wade
Source: Wired
Date (published): 14/01/2015
Date (accessed): 20/01/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Strategically ignored by Mexico’s major telecoms, Yaee is putting itself on the mobile communications grid with the help of a Oaxaca-based telecommunications non-profit called Rhizomatica.

Syndicate content