information accessibility

Mobile app helps teachers to support literacy efforts

Title: Mobile app helps teachers to support literacy efforts
Source: Development Innovations Cambodia
Date (accessed): 08/05/2015
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Each year Cambodian schools struggle to recruit enough teachers to meet the growing school-age population. The average student-teacher ratio is approximately 46 to one, with classrooms in some provinces exceeding 62 students per instructor. The shortage is particularly acute in primary schools. In order to mitigate the critical shortage of teachers and promote strong foundations for literacy in Grades 1 & 2, World Education’s Technology for Education Systems Transformation project (TEST) developed a mobile application that automates student reading assessments using mobile tablet computers.

Crowd-Sourced Flood Report App Allows Quick Evacuations in Jakarta

Title: Crowd-Sourced Flood Report App Allows Quick Evacuations in Jakarta
Source: Japan International Cooperation Agency - JICA
Date (published): 27/04/2015
Date (accessed): 08/05/2015
Type of information: application
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A new Android smart phone app developed with Japan's help allows Jakarta residents to share real-time, map-based information on flooding in the metropolitan area.

ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya

Title: ICT skills set to develop with new MOU in Kenya
Source: IT News Africa
Date (published): 27/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The ICT Authority and Microsoft have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which will, among other things, see Microsoft offer support in providing a platform that will enable ICT skills training for up to 300 000 teachers.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. The solution to this dilemma may surprise you.

How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake

Title: How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake
Author: Timo Luege
Source: Social Media for Good
Date (published): 26/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Following earthquake in Nepal, Facebook activated “Safety Check“, a feature that helps friends and relatives quickly find out whether their loved ones are safe.

How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake

Title: How Facebook helped restore family links after the Nepal earthquake
Author: Timo Luege
Source: Social Media for Good
Date (published): 26/04/2015
Date (accessed): 02/05/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Following earthquake in Nepal, Facebook activated “Safety Check“, a feature that helps friends and relatives quickly find out whether their loved ones are safe.

8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women

Title: 8 Considerations for Better Mobile Learning Solutions for Women
Author: Alexandra Tyers
Source: ICTworks
Date (published): 17/04/2015
Date (accessed): 20/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Tigo Biashara is one of two mobile education services that GSMA Connected Women has awarded grants to – the other one is an English skill development service in Bangladesh, aimed improving employability prospects for rural adolescent girls through lessons delivered on voice and SMS platforms, and developed by BRAC Bangladesh in partnership with Robi Axiata.

It Took India Almost 10 Years To Realise That Women Empowerment Is Possible Through ICT

Title: It Took India Almost 10 Years To Realise That Women Empowerment Is Possible Through ICT
Author: Ram Kaushik
Source: GroundReport
Date (published): 15/03/2015
Date (accessed): 15/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: The year was 2006 when Praveen Dalal suggested the use of ICT for Women Empowerment in India (PDF). However, it took almost 10 years for India to realise that women empowerment is possible though ICT. Narendra Modi government has finally appreciated this fact and has introduced the Digital India project covering this aspect as well. However, there are many limitations and shortcomings of Digital India project of India as on date and with these limitations and shortcomings the effect of Digital India would not be as conducive as anticipated.

Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers

Title: Why a mobile-technology revolution needs teachers
Author: Caroline Schmitt
Source: Deutsche Welle
Date (published): 02/04/2015
Date (accessed): 15/04/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile tech is revolutionizing banking and farming in Africa. But when it comes to education, it's increasing the gap between rural and urban communities. When it comes to education, it's rural Sub-Saharan Africa that needs a revolution most: 56 million people aged 15-24 in haven't completed primary school, while 774 million people - two-thirds of them women - cannot read or write. With an estimated 635 million mobile phone subscriptions currently in the region, many are pinning their hopes on mobile technologies such as free online learning materials, math apps and offline encyclopedias to help tackle the problems.

Why developing nations love and hate the internet

Title: Why developing nations love and hate the internet
Source: The Times of India
Date (published): 20/03/2015
Date (accessed): 02/04/2015
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: People in emerging economies see the internet as a good thing for education and the economy, but worry about its impact on morality, a global survey showed. The Pew Research Center survey showed a median of 64% of respondents in 32 emerging and developing nations say the internet is a positive for education. A majority also see the internet as a good influence on personal relationships and the economy, but offer a mixed view on other impacts.

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