telecommunications

Mobile Phone Use in West Africa: Gambian Statistics

Title: Mobile Phone Use in West Africa: Gambian Statistics
Author: Richard Heeks
Source: ICTs for Development blog
Date (published): 30/01/2011
Date (accessed): 31/01/2011
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
"This entry reports findings from a survey of nearly 400 mobile phone users in The Gambia conducted by Fatim Badjie, who recently participated in Manchester’s MSc in ICTs for Development.

Its findings fall into six main areas:
Ownership and Costs
Mobile Usage
Availability and Issues
Impacts and Benefits
Male-female differences
Locational differences
...
My commentary would be that, overall, this is a reminder of how mature the mobile market is getting in Africa with very high rates of ownership, very high rates of usage, and signs of movement beyond basic calls/SMS: at least 15% going online via their mobiles, at least 13% using video/conference calls. With roughly one-third saying they use mobiles to make or get money, it looks like quite a valuable financial tool: so embedded that nearly fourth-fifths of users couldn’t imagine life without it, including some who see mobiles as a “necessary burden”."

Survey reveals bridging digital divide between urban and rural Africa represents major growth opportunity

Title: Survey reveals bridging digital divide between urban and rural Africa represents major growth opportunity
Author:Denise Duffy
Source:ModernGhana.com
Date (published):03/11/2010
Date (accessed):12/11/2010
Type of information:article
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
"Connecting rural communities has become a major issue for the telecommunications industry in Africa, according to a recent survey conducted by Informa Telecoms & Media. 75% of respondents* surveyed said that the improvement of access to and adoption of telecommunications services in rural areas is “very important” to their business. A further 20% thought it “moderately important”.

Commissioned as a part of Informa Telecoms & Media's Rural Connectivity in Africa research, which is due to be published this month, the findings of the study reveal how the mobile revolution has failed to touch all parts of Africa. That this is the case is holding the continent back from becoming a fully joined-up member of the global knowledge economy.
...
Access to power emerges as a recurrent theme throughout the results of the survey as a barrier to greater rural connectivity. When asked what is the single biggest barrier facing operators in the greater adoption of ICT services in rural areas, over a third of respondents from Africa cited “access to power” as the single biggest obstacle for operators, ahead of cost of ownership and lack of awareness. Very low electrification rates across sub-Saharan Africa and especially in rural communities, where they tend to fall well below 20%, have a huge impact on the availability of ICT services in remote areas."

Who's got the phone? Gender and the use of the telephone at the bottom of the pyramid

Title: Who's got the phone? Gender and the use of the telephone at the bottom of the pyramid
Authors: Ayesha Zainudeen, Tahani Iqbal, and Rohan Samarajiva
Pages: 37 pp.
Source: LIRNEasia
Date (published): 15/06/2010
Date (accessed): 17/06/2010
Type of information: research paper, pre-publication draft
Language: English
On-line access: yes (pdf)
Abstract:
Much has been said about women’s access to and use of the telephone. Many studies conclude that a significant gender divide in access exists particularly in developing countries. Women are also said to use telephones in a different manner from men – making and receiving more calls, spending more time on calls, and using telephones primarily for ‘relationship maintenance’ purposes, in contrast to men. However, much of this research on usage patterns is based on small-sample studies in affluent developed countries. The article provides evidence that a significant gender divide in access to telephones exists in Pakistan and India, to a lesser extent in Sri Lanka, but is generally absent in the Philippines and Thailand. This article also challenges some of the findings of studies which claim that women’s and men’s use is fundamentally different, shedding light on women’s access to and use of telecom services at the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) in five Emerging Asian markets.

2010 Global Telecommunications Predictions

Title: 2010 Global Telecommunications Predictions
Authors: John Ruffolo, Paul Lee, Duncan Stewart
Publisher: Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu
Date (published): 21/01/2010
Date (accessed): 27/01/2010
Type of information: business report
Language: English
On-line access: yes (pdf)
Abstract:
Deloitte’s annual global telecommunications predictions report identifies network, device, and application trends likely to affect consumers and businesses in 2010. The topics covered in this year’s report include the following:

* Growing importance of mobile search for smartphones
* Changes in network technologies and pricing plans to cope with the explosion of data
* Rethinking the reliability requirements of wireless networks compared to landline
* Changing the scale of wireless contracts both in terms of up-time and duration

Connecting the Unconnected – Technology Transfer to Rural Areas in Zambia

Title: Connecting the Unconnected – Technology Transfer to Rural Areas in Zambia
Source: eLearning Africa
Publisher: ICWE GmbH, Berlin
Date (published): 21/12/2009
Date (accessed): 21/01/2010
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
In January 2010, in order to connect rural areas lacking any IT infrastructure to the Internet, the Fraunhofer FOKUS, a branch of Germany’s largest research organisation, the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, will breathe life into the FOKUS NET4DC. Together with partners from target regions, this international centre for information and communication technologies in developing countries will develop and make available tailor-made IT infrastructures and communication networks. The robust technology is being developed in Germany, and a first successful pilot project was recently initiated in the Southern Province of Zambia.

Engineers Race to Restore Communications after Haiti Quake

Title: Engineers Race to Restore Communications after Haiti Quake
Author: Harry Goldstein
Source: IEEE Spectrum
Publisher: IEEE
Date (published): 19/01/2010
Date (accessed): 20/01/2010
Type of information: article
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
With thousands of doctors, nurses, aid workers and troops descending on Port-au-Prince in the last week to join more than 800 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) already there, reporters on the ground have observed that the damage done to the telecommunications infrastructure is hampering coordination efforts. But in an ironic twist, it turns out that Haiti's Internet connectivity is robust precisely because its telecommunications infrastructure is so underdeveloped. Specifically, most Haitian ISPs connect to the Internet via satellite and are not dependent on the country's lone undersea fiber optic cable link, which was knocked out the during the quake. The challenge for engineers now is the proverbial last mile--getting local connections to satellites restored so NGOs can get online.

via http://twitter.com/ICT_Works

A Historical View of Pakistan Telecom Industry and Its Impact on Pakistan Culture

Title: A Historical View of Pakistan Telecom Industry and Its Impact on Pakistan Culture
Author: Babar Bhatti
Source: State of Telecom Industry in Pakistan
Date (published): 28/12/2009
Date (accessed): 28/12/2009
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
Taimur Sikander has written an interesting article for Dawn about the long way that telecom has come in Pakistan and the impact of mobile phones and telecommunication on Pakistan society. I particularly like how he provides snapshots of the early days, and the way politics, arts and culture were shaped by telecom.

Using ICT research to assist policy making and regulation: the case of Namibia

Title: Using ICT research to assist policy making and regulation: the case of Namibia
Authors: Christoph Stork, Tony Vetter
Pages: 14 pp.
Source: CPRsouth
Date (published): 15/12/2009
Date (accessed): 21/12/2009
Type of information: conference paper
Language: English
On-line access: yes (pdf)
Abstract:
This paper examines three barriers to effective policy-making and regulation in developing countries: inefficient operators; information asymmetry between regulator and operators; and where the role of the regulator to balance the interests of consumers, competing enterprises and investors is not being fulfilled. The paper demonstrates how ICT research of Research ICT Africa in combination with multiple communication strategies have been used to assist regulators and policy makers in making informed decisions and led to market liberalization and legislative and regulatory reform in Namibia. A presentation on research
results to the Namibian president and cabinet in 2006, private sector co-funding of research projects, over 80 newspaper articles covering research results, 21 magazine articles, six target policy briefs, radio and TV interviews, face to face consultations all helped shaping public opinion and informing policy makers and regulators. This paper describes how ICT research was translated into useful information and advice for policy makers and regulators by working with journalists, providing strategic information to the private sector, researching issues for the regulator and maintaining impartiality.

See also:
Presentation pdf

Wireless Technology for Social Change: Trends in Mobile Use by NGOs

Title: Wireless Technology for Social Change: Trends in Mobile Use by NGOs
Authors: Sheila Kinkade and Katrin Verclas
Pages: 60 pp.
Source: Access to Communication Publication Series Volume 2
Publisher: UN Foundation–Vodafone Group Foundation Partnership
Date (published): 23/05/2008
Date (accessed): 22/11/2009
Type of information: evaluation survey
Language: English
On-line access: yes (pdf)
Abstract:
In this second publication in our Access to Communications Publication Series, the authors examine real-life examples of and trends in wireless technology solutions being used to drive change in the areas of health, humanitarian assistance, and environmental conservation. The compelling stories portrayed in this report demonstrate that telecommunications can be a powerful tool for positive change in our world.
Between December 10, 2007 and January 13, 2008, 560 non-governmental organization (NGO) workers participated in a survey designed to demonstrate how NGOs are using wireless technology to help reach various social, civil, economic, and political goals.

Regionalizing telecommunications reform in West Africa

Title: Regionalizing telecommunications reform in West Africa
Authors: Ioannis N. Kessides, Roger G. Noll, Nancy C. Benjamin
Pages: 105 pp.
Source: Policy Research working paper, no. WPS 5126
Publisher: The World Bank Group
Date (published): 11/11/2009
Date (accessed): 11/11/2009
Type of information: research paper
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML and pdf)
Abstract:
In recent years, there has been an increasing recognition that significant welfare gains could be realized through deep forms of regional integration which entail harmonization of legal, regulatory and institutional frameworks. Reforms that reduce cross-border transaction costs and improve the performance of "backbone" infrastructure services are arguably even more important for the creation of an open, unified regional economic space than trade policy reforms narrowly defined. This paper assesses the potential gains from regionalized telecommunications policy in West Africa. To this end, the paper: (i) discusses how regional cooperation can overcome national limits in technical expertise, enhance the capacity of nations credibly to commit to stable regulatory policy, and ultimately facilitate infrastructure investment in the region; (ii) identifies trade-distorting regulations that inhibit opportunities for regional trade and economic development, and so are good candidates for regional trade negotiations to reduce indirect trade barriers; and (iii) describes substantive elements of a harmonized regional regulatory policy that can deliver immediate performance benefits.

Syndicate content