ICT4E

Capacity Building for ICT in Education

Title: Capacity Building for ICT in Education
Source:Digital Opportunity
Date (published):20/10/2010
Date (accessed):16/11/2010
Type of information:article
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
„Capacity Building for ICT in Education, an infoDev-commissioned paper by Price Waterhouse Coopers India, says most South Asian nations need to complement their basic ICT4E infrastructure needs, such as computers, connectivity, and physical resources, with investment in mass-based learning networks, content support and development initiatives.
...
The infoDev / PWC India report identifies the main challenges to ICT4E capacity-building in South Asia:
* Increase in the use of ICT in education has not occurred at the same pace as the increase in overall ICT infrastructure, and the overall increase in ICT availability has not yet reached a stage of providing access to most people in South Asia
* Absence of integration and interaction across the South Asian region restricts sharing of information resources and creates duplication of efforts, resulting in ineffective use of ICT
* Absence of trained teachers of high quality and caliber
* Restrictive access to ICT facilities results in a lack of ICT enablement
* Absence of authentic and adequate data on access and use hampers policymakers
* Narrowly focused interventions limit the overall gain from ICT and miss the broader vision and goals of the sector
* Continued need for a minimal level of physical and complementary infrastructure
* Low use of ICTs’ potential”

African Ministers Pass ICT Directive

Title: African Ministers Pass ICT Directive
Source: eLearning Africa
Date (published): 13/07/2010
Date (accessed): 14/07/2010
Type of information: article
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
African countries have to balance their spending on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for education better. Skills development among teachers, which accounts for only 10% of most countries’ ICT budgets, has to be strengthened. Spending on costly hardware, which covers 90% of most countries budgets, should rather be reduced. This is one of the key recommendations of a communiqué released by participants in the Third African Ministerial Round Table on ICT for Education, Training and Development.

Frustrations with One Laptop Per Child Initiative

Title: Frustrations with One Laptop Per Child Initiative
Author: Sam Lanfranco
Source: OLPC News
Date (published): 18/06/2010
Date (accessed): 20/06/2010
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
I have been working in the ICT area since the late 1970's - hence my userID of "lanfran" from back when email names were unix restricted to less than 8 characters. I am a big supporter of (proper) ICT4DEV, yet it was clear from the start that the OLPC strategy was flawed.

There were questions and issues raised when the project was first proposed, and those questions and issues are still being raised. OLPC has never felt it necessary to address the criticisms other than paint a rosy picture of what (maybe) could be done if OLPC could actually saturate developing countries with its computer.

Children with home computers likely to have lower test scores, study finds

Title: Children with home computers likely to have lower test scores, study finds
Source: ScienceDaily
Date (published): 18/06/2010
Date (accessed): 19/06/2010
Type of information: article
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
Around the country and throughout the world, politicians and education activists have sought to eliminate the "digital divide" by guaranteeing universal access to home computers, and in some cases to high-speed Internet service.

However, according to a new study by scholars at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy, these efforts would actually widen the achievement gap in math and reading scores. Students in grades five through eight, particularly those from disadvantaged families, tend to post lower scores once these technologies arrive in their home.

...The sample size was large -- numbering more than 150,000 individual students. The data allowed researchers to compare the same children's reading and math scores before and after they acquired a home computer, and to compare those scores to those of peers who had a home computer by fifth grade and to test scores of students who never acquire a home computer. The negative effects on reading and math scores were "modest but significant," they found.

Download the report: Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement
Jacob L. Vigdor, Helen F. Ladd
NBER Working Paper No. 16078
Issued in June 2010
pdf file

Emerging Trajectories and Sustainability of ICTs in Educational Reforms in Africa: Exploring the Prospects of the Teacher Laptop Policy in South Africa

Title: Emerging Trajectories and Sustainability of ICTs in Educational Reforms in Africa: Exploring the Prospects of the Teacher Laptop Policy in South Africa
Author: Chijioke J. Evoh
Pages: 13 pp.
ISSN: 1554-2262
Source: Journal of Education for International Development 4:2, December 2009
Publisher: Educational Quality Improvement Program (EQUIP)and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
Date (published): 22/12/2009
Date (accessed): 29/01/2010
Type of information: research paper
Language: English
On-line access: yes (pdf)
Abstract:
The integration of information communication technologies (ICTs) in education is part of the effort to ensure a better outcome in public education. Other sectors of the society have raised productivity by using technology to augment human labor. However, the teaching profession in Africa has become more labor-intensive due to lack of necessary resources. In line with the goal of raising teacher productivity, and given the shortage of qualified teachers in the system, the Teacher Laptop Initiative (TLI) policy in South Africa aims to bring innovation in the teaching profession by constantly improving the contents and pedagogical skills of teachers. Based on the technological, pedagogical and content knowledge theoretical framework, this study explores the prospects and challenges of the TLI program. As desirable as policy may be, this paper argues that a successful TLI in South African schools will go beyond providing teachers with laptop computers. The success will depend on how well the laptops are used by teachers for productive educational outcomes.

An Analysis of the Research and Impact of ICT in Education in Developing Country Contexts

Title: An Analysis of the Research and Impact of ICT in Education in Developing Country Contexts
Authors: Nitika Tolani-Brown, Meredith McCormac, Roy Zimmermann
Pages: 12 pp.
ISSN: 1554-2262
Source: Journal of Education for International Development 4:2, December 2009
Publisher: Educational Quality Improvement Program (EQUIP)and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
Date (published): 23/12/2009
Date (accessed): 29/01/2010
Type of information: research paper
Language: English
On-line access: yes (pdf)
Abstract:
Despite evidence of increased usage of information and communication technology (ICT) in educational programming, extant evaluations on the impact of ICT on educational child outcomes are sparse and often lack the methodological rigor necessary to guide policymakers towards sound, evidence-based practices. The American Institutes for Research (AIR) has conducted a global analysis of research undertaken to date on the deployment of ICT solutions to support education goals in developing countries. The present study is comprised of two phases. First, a series of in-depth, structured interviews were conducted with a range of stakeholders, including policymakers and academicians, researchers, users and developers of ICT solutions. These interviews touched upon the challenges associated with developing, implementing and evaluating ICT solutions within educational settings, perceptions on the utility and future of ICT solutions and extant gaps in the usage of ICT solutions within developing countries. Second, AIR conducted a detailed literature review of published and unpublished evaluations on the educational impacts of ICT solutions. This paper reports on the demonstrated and measurable impacts of ICT on students and generates an innovative and rigorous research agenda addressing salient issues such as impact and effectiveness, return on investment, and total cost of ownership.

The UNESCO Prize on ICT use in education

Title: The UNESCO Prize on ICT use in education
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: EduTech, A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education
Publisher: # The World Bank Group
Date (published): 22/01/2010
Date (accessed): 27/01/2010
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
The UNESCO King Hamad Bin Isa Al-Khalifa Prize is perhaps the highest profile international award given to acknowledge excellence in the use of ICTs in education around the world. Created in 2005 following a donation made by the Kingdom of Bahrain, it is meant "to reward projects and activities of individuals, institutions, other entities or non-governmental organizations for excellent models, best practice, and creative use of information and communication technologies to enhance learning, teaching and overall educational performance".

How do you evaluate a plan like Ceibal?

Title: How do you evaluate a plan like Ceibal?
Author: Michael Trucano
Source: EduTech
Publisher: The World Bank Group
Date (published): 11/12/2009
Date (accessed): 16/12/2009
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
If you have had your fill of theories and promises about what the widespread diffusion of information and communication technologies (ICTs) might mean for teaching and learning practices across an entire education system and want to see what actual practice looks like, a trip to Montevideo (or better yet, one of the regions outside the Uruguayan capital) should be high on your list.

Under Plan Ceibal (earlier blog post here), Uruguay is the first country in the world to ensure that all primary school students (or at least those in public schools) have their own personal laptop. For free. (The program is being extended to high schools, and, under a different financial scheme, to private schools as well). Ceibal is about more than just 'free laptops for kids', however.

Increasing education access through open and distance learning in Tanzania: A critical review of approaches and practices

Title: Increasing education access through open and distance learning in Tanzania: A critical review of approaches and practices
Author: Willy L.M. Komba
ISBN: 1814-0556
Source: International Journal of Education and Development using ICT, Vol. 5, No. 5 (2009)
Publisher: International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology
Date (published): 24/10/2009
Date (accessed): 12/12/2009
Type of information: peer-reviewed article
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML)
Abstract:
With an area of 943,000 square kilometers, Tanzania has a population of about 34 million comprising more than 120 ethnic groups with diverse cultures and notable income differentials. Over 35 per cent of the people live below the poverty line which makes it difficult for an increasing number of people to access education at secondary, tertiary and higher education levels. The universalization of education and its worldwide acceptance as a continuous or lifelong undertaking, coupled with concerns about educational access and equity, as well as the prevailing level of poverty necessitates the use of various education delivery approaches to enable all citizens to benefit from this public good. The major objective of this paper is to document an discuss the initiatives that Tanzania has taken to expand educational opportunities at various levels using open and distance learning (ODL) approaches. The paper begins by explaining the socio-political context for ODL in Mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar and proceeds to recount the distance education initiatives that have been established over time using both the longstanding traditional technologies and new media and technology. It then analyzes the opportunities and challenges in these initiatives. It ends with the proposal of how to improve both access and the quality of education using emerging educational technologies.

The Open University UK: creating a win-win situation by sharing code and content

Title: The Open University UK: creating a win-win situation by sharing code and content
Author: Gregor Bierhals
Pages: 12 pp.
Source: Open Source Observatory and Repository (OSOR), osor.eu
Publisher: IDABC
Date (published): 27/10/2009
Date (accessed): 12/12/2009
Type of information: case study
Language: English
On-line access: yes (HTML, pdf, odt)
Abstract:
In 2005 The Open University (OU) UK, one of Europe's largest distance learning universities, established that it was time to deploy a new Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), for both The Open University itself as well as for their OpenLearn project aimed at providing free open educational resources (OER) to the general public. A team with different sub-tasks was formed, which investigated future learning environments and how learning material was presented and disseminated through those. Next to this, the OU also researched open learning models, as part of the OpenLearn project. The team of researchers and technical staff, after setting out the components required to meet the OU's needs the most appropriate match was determined. The choice fell on the VLE Moodle, which is an open source product. Today the Moodle VLE has been successfully implemented at the OU and the OU has further published a significant amount of their learning material under a Creative Commons license as courses on the Moodle VLE based OpenLearn website, which are freely available to anyone interested. The OU continues to collaborate closely with the Moodle community , as this provides a very large platform for feedback and information. All the OU's development are given back to the Moodle community, which improves the product for the OU and the rest of the community.

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