big data

Ensuring Developing Countries Benefit from Big Data

Title: Ensuring Developing Countries Benefit from Big Data
Source: IDS - Institute of Development Studies
Date (published): 14/12/2015
Date (accessed): 19/12/2015
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: With 90 percent of data in existence created in just the last two years and the quantity doubling every two years, a new policy briefing ‘Ensuring Developing Countries Benefit from Big Data’ and report on ‘Big Data and International Development’, examine the role big data is playing globally and in developing countries.

Risks in the digital revolution era
In the ‘digital revolution’ era, IDS research fellow Dr Stephen Spratt finds many opportunities for health and education systems and skills and employment in big data for developing countries, but also uncovers significant risks too. One issue highlighted is the opaque nature of big data decisions, made in secret and currently being undertaken without wider consultation in trade deals such as TTIP and TISA.

Global and national policy recommendations
The report and policy briefing call for a more open and transparent international data industry, with corporations and governments allowing citizens greater access and control of the information held about them. Further global and national policy recommendations include an international bill of data rights and investment in ICT skills and infrastructure in order to prevent developing countries from missing out on big data benefits.

Multi-national digital corporations
Also highlighted is the need for greater consistency between multi-national corporations’ approaches to data privacy in countries they operate in around the world and the country in which their organisation is based.

Digital Security in Aid and Development

Title: Digital Security in Aid and Development
Author: Rahel Dette
Source: GPPi - Global Public Policy Institute
Date (published): 18/11/2015
Date (accessed): 27/11/2015
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Technologies are used increasingly in humanitarian, development and human rights. This field of work is sometimes abbreviated with “ICT4D,” or information communication technologies for development. But new technologies can also introduce new risks, especially concerning digital security and privacy. To make ICT4D more secure and safe, aid actors (or anyone working with technologies) can use “threat models” to play through possible attacks and hacks ahead of time. Being more alert to digital vulnerabilities can help prevent data breaches and devastating damage, which is especially important in the aid sector.

The Digital Matatus Project

Title: The Digital Matatus Project
Source: digitalmatatus.com
Date (accessed): 06/11/2015
Type of information: best practice
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Digital Matatus shows how to leverage the ubiquitous nature of cellphone technology in developing countries to collect data for essential infrastructure, give it out freely and in the process spur innovation and improved services for citizens. Conceived out of collaboration between Kenyan and American universities and the technology sector in Nairobi, this project captured transit data for Nairobi, developed mobile routing applications and designed a new transit map for the city. The data, maps and apps are free and available to the public, transforming the way people navigate and think about their transportation system.

Mobile phone data used to track Ebola spread

Title: Mobile phone data used to track Ebola spread
Author: Phillippa Biggs
Source: Infonetica
Date (accessed): 25/10/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Mobile phone tracking software is viewed with suspicion by many but it could be helping save lives by tracking movements in Ebola-torn West Africa.

How Big Data will help fight global epidemics

Title: How Big Data will help fight global epidemics
Author: Cosmas Zavazava
Source: The ITU Blog
Date (published): 13/10/2015
Date (accessed): 25/10/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Big data and its application for saving lives is maturing. Today, big data is being used to help manage disease outbreaks, enabling humanitarian agencies and NGOs to see trends and correlations, helping them to interpret the data to aid effective decision making. ITU have developed an innovative new project that uses big data to help aid agencies track the outbreak of disease while safeguarding individual privacy. The project is based on a co-financed partnership between the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the Government of Japan and currently supports Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia by tracking the Ebola outbreak using official data from Mobile Network Operators in the region.

How Can We All Profit From Development Data?

Title: How Can We All Profit From Development Data?
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 18/03/2015
Date (accessed): 23/03/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Big data has been called the new oil, and it is easy to see why. In its raw form, it provides limited value, but with the right refinement it has the potential to generate enormous value to the global economy. As with oil, it is also those with the most sophisticated machinery—in terms of the most powerful network of processors and algorithms—that are most likely to extract the greatest amount of wealth from the world’s zettabytes of digital data. While the majority of that data is currently from the world’s mature markets, in the next three years data from emerging markets are estimated to take the lead.

Open data: how mobile phones saved bananas from bacterial wilt in Uganda

Title: Open data: how mobile phones saved bananas from bacterial wilt in Uganda
Author: Anna Scott
Source: The Guardian
Date (published): 11/02/2015
Date (accessed): 14/02/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: As disease threatened crops across the country, an initiative from the government and Unicef was able to communicate fast to stop it - demonstrating how open data can transform development.

Is African broadband data worth it?

Title: Is African broadband data worth it?
Source: oAfrica
Date (published): 20/01/2015
Date (accessed): 25/01/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A Research ICT Africa policy brief from June 2014 asks the question: “Is broadband data worth the money?” The answer depends on where you live.

How Mobile Phone Data Reveals Food Consumption Patterns in Central Africa

Title: How Mobile Phone Data Reveals Food Consumption Patterns in Central Africa
Source: MIT Technology Review
Date (published): 17/12/2014
Date (accessed): 30/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Food shortages in developing countries have always been difficult to monitor in real time. But mobile phone data is changing that, say demographers.

How Government Can Unlock Economic Benefits from Open Data: Part I

Title: How Government Can Unlock Economic Benefits from Open Data: Part I
Author: Tod Newcombe
Source: Government Technology
Date (published): 16/12/2014
Date (accessed): 30/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Zillow, the fast-growing online real estate marketplace, couldn’t exist without public data. More specifically, it probably couldn’t exist without online public data relating to real estate sales information. The nation has more than 3,000 counties, each with its own registry of deeds where routine but vital data are recorded on every transaction involving the sale of homes, businesses and land. Until recently, much of that information resided in paper documents stored in filing cabinets. But as that information has moved online, its value has increased, making it possible for firms like Zillow to use the data in new ways, creating its popular “zestimate” forecast on home values.

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