big data

How Can We All Profit From Development Data?

Title: How Can We All Profit From Development Data?
Source: ICTWorks
Date (published): 18/03/2015
Date (accessed): 23/03/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Big data has been called the new oil, and it is easy to see why. In its raw form, it provides limited value, but with the right refinement it has the potential to generate enormous value to the global economy. As with oil, it is also those with the most sophisticated machinery—in terms of the most powerful network of processors and algorithms—that are most likely to extract the greatest amount of wealth from the world’s zettabytes of digital data. While the majority of that data is currently from the world’s mature markets, in the next three years data from emerging markets are estimated to take the lead.

Open data: how mobile phones saved bananas from bacterial wilt in Uganda

Title: Open data: how mobile phones saved bananas from bacterial wilt in Uganda
Author: Anna Scott
Source: The Guardian
Date (published): 11/02/2015
Date (accessed): 14/02/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: As disease threatened crops across the country, an initiative from the government and Unicef was able to communicate fast to stop it - demonstrating how open data can transform development.

Is African broadband data worth it?

Title: Is African broadband data worth it?
Source: oAfrica
Date (published): 20/01/2015
Date (accessed): 25/01/2015
Type of information: blog post
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: A Research ICT Africa policy brief from June 2014 asks the question: “Is broadband data worth the money?” The answer depends on where you live.

How Mobile Phone Data Reveals Food Consumption Patterns in Central Africa

Title: How Mobile Phone Data Reveals Food Consumption Patterns in Central Africa
Source: MIT Technology Review
Date (published): 17/12/2014
Date (accessed): 30/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Food shortages in developing countries have always been difficult to monitor in real time. But mobile phone data is changing that, say demographers.

How Government Can Unlock Economic Benefits from Open Data: Part I

Title: How Government Can Unlock Economic Benefits from Open Data: Part I
Author: Tod Newcombe
Source: Government Technology
Date (published): 16/12/2014
Date (accessed): 30/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Zillow, the fast-growing online real estate marketplace, couldn’t exist without public data. More specifically, it probably couldn’t exist without online public data relating to real estate sales information. The nation has more than 3,000 counties, each with its own registry of deeds where routine but vital data are recorded on every transaction involving the sale of homes, businesses and land. Until recently, much of that information resided in paper documents stored in filing cabinets. But as that information has moved online, its value has increased, making it possible for firms like Zillow to use the data in new ways, creating its popular “zestimate” forecast on home values.

Off the map

Title: Off the map
Source: The Economist
Date (published): 15/11/2014
Date (accessed): 02/12/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Africa is the continent of missing data. Fewer than half of births are recorded; some countries have not taken a census in several decades. On maps only big cities and main streets are identified; the rest looks as empty as the Sahara. Lack of data afflicts other developing regions, too. The self-built slums that ring many Latin American cities are poorly mapped, and even estimates of their population are vague. Afghanistan is still using census figures from 1979—and that count was cut short after census-takers were killed by mujahideen. As rich countries collect and analyse data from as many objects and activities as possible—including thermostats, fitness trackers and location-based services such as Foursquare—a data divide has opened up. The lack of reliable data in poor countries thwarts both development and disaster-relief.

We need a ‘data revolution’ for the urban poor

Title: We need a ‘data revolution’ for the urban poor
Author: Paula Lucci
Source: Post2015.org
Date (published): 10/11/2014
Date (accessed): 26/11/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Last week the UN Independent Expert Advisory Group released its report on the ‘Data Revolution’. Appointed by the Secretary-General, this group looked into how to improve existing data on sustainable development, so that when countries in the General Assembly agree a new set of goals next year, we have better information to monitor them. It’s hard to disagree with the need for better data: accurate and open data is a key building block of effective policy, and a way for citizens to hold governments to account. Yet despite recent improvements in the availability and quality of data, basic information on the poor is still missing or based on imperfect estimates. What’s more, the increasing ambition of a post-2015 agenda to reach the most marginalised and eradicate extreme poverty means that we will need more information for these vulnerable groups than we currently have. The urban poor living in ‘slum’ areas are one such vulnerable group. With their numbers set to increase over coming years, we desperately need more and better data on these communities – but there are some big limitations.

Hungry Planet: Can Big Data Help Feed 9 Billion Humans?

Title: Hungry Planet: Can Big Data Help Feed 9 Billion Humans?
Author: John Roach
Source: NBC News
Date (published): 18/11/2014
Date (accessed): 26/11/2014
Type of information: online article
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: With a population set to hit 9 billion human beings by 2050, the world needs to grow more food —without cutting down forests and jungles, which are the climate's huge lungs. The solution, according to one soil management scientist, is Big Data. Kenneth Cassman, an agronomist at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, recently unveiled a new interactive mapping tool that shows in fine-grain detail where higher crop yields are possible on current arable land.

Big Data in Action for Development

Title: Big Data in Action for Development
Date (accessed): 31/10/2014
Type of information: research report
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: This report stemmed from a World Bank pilot activity to explore the potential of big data to address development challenges in Central American countries. As part of this activity we collected and analyzed a number of examples of leveraging big data for development. Because of the growing interest in this topic this report makes available to
a broader audience those examples as well as the underlying conceptual framework to think about big data for development.

Big Data & Society

Title: Big Data & Society
Editor and Founding Editor: Evelyn Ruppert
Source: SAGE Journals
Date (accessed): 24/06/2014
Type of information: data source
Language: English
On-line access: yes
Abstract: Big Data & Society is an open access peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes interdisciplinary work principally in the social sciences, humanities and computing and their intersections with the arts and natural sciences about the implications of Big Data for societies.

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